The United States and Cuba: Hegemony and Dependent Development, 1880–1934

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, Nov 15, 1977 - History - 280 pages
From its independence from Spain in 1898 until the 1960s, Cuba was dominated by the political and economic presence of the United States. Benjamin studies this unequal relationship through 1934, by examining U.S. trade, investment, and capital lending; Cuban institutions and social movements; and U.S. foreign policy. Benjamin convincingly argues that U.S. hegemony shaped Cuban internal politics by exploiting the island's economy, dividing the nationalist movement, co-opting Cuban moderates, and robbing post-1933 leadership of its legitimacy.
 

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Contents

1 The Origins of Hegemony 18801902
3
2 The US Economic and Political Presence 19021924
13
The US Economic Presence 19251932
28
4 Hegemony and Nationalism 19251932
49
5 The New Deal Prepares for Power
72
6 The New Deal and the Search for Cuban StabilityPart 1
88
7 The New Deal and the Search for Cuban StabilityPart 2
112
8 The Cuban Revolution of September 1933
128
9 The New Deal and the Collapse of Cuban Stability
150
10 The Restoration of Hegemonic Stability
171
11 Hegemony and Stalemate
183
Notes
191
Bibliography
243
Index
261
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About the author (1977)

Jules Robert Benjamin is professor emeritus of history at Ithaca College.

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