The Vaccine Book

Front Cover
Barry R. Bloom, Paul-Henri Lambert
Academic Press, Dec 12, 2002 - Medical - 436 pages
The Vaccine Book provides comprehensive information on the current and future world of vaccines. It reveals the scientific opportunities and potential impact of vaccines, including economic and ethical challenges, problems encountered when producing vaccines, how clinical vaccine trials are designed, and how to introduce vaccines into widespread use. Although vaccines are now available for many diseases, there are still challenges ahead for major diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The Vaccine Book is designed for students, researchers, public health officials, and all others interested in increasing their understanding of vaccines.

Topics unique to this book:
* Ethics
* Economics
* Diseases that could be prevented
* Clinical trial designs
* Ideas about the future of vaccines
* Challenges facing research scientists in the vaccine area
* Burden of vaccine-preventable illness and the impact of vaccines
* Scientific obstacles to be overcome by existing and new vaccines
* Basic mechanisms of host immunity and pathogen interaction with host tissues
* New approaches to future vaccines against challenging diseases
* Real and perceived safety issues which dominate vaccine development and vaccination policies
* Microbial pathogenesis as a basis for vaccine design
* Planning vaccine trials
* Introducing new vaccines into the healthcare system
* Future challenges for vaccines and immunizations
 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1 GLOBAL BURDEN OF DISEASE
1
CHAPTER 2 IMMUNOLOGY
51
CHAPTER 3 TRIAL DESIGN FOR VACCINES
85
CHAPTER 4 ETHICS AND VACCINES
119
CHAPTER 5 UNDERSTANDING MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS AS A BASIS FOR VACCINE DESIGN
129
Selected Cases
179
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About the author (2002)

Paul-Henri Lambert, MD, is now associated with the Centre of Vaccinology in the Department of Pathology and Immunology at University of Geneva. He is particularly interested in vaccination strategies and evaluation of adverse effects. He is directing the International Advanced Course of Vaccinology (ADVAC) organized under the auspices of the Fondation Mérieux and University of Geneva. He is a member of the Governing Board of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (TBVI) and past-chairman of the Human Vaccine Committee of the International Association for Biologicals (IABS) and of the WHO GACVS (Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety). Paul Henri Lambert is a native of Belgium where he was boarded in Internal Medicine (University of Liege). He joined Frank Dixon at Scripps Institute, La Jolla, California, for his training then moved to University of Geneva Medical School where he became professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Pathology. His research activities lead him to decipher immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmune and immune complex-mediated diseases, in the pathogenesis of malaria and in new strategies to optimize vaccine immunogenicity. In 1987, he was appointed as chief Microbiology and Immunology at the World Health Organization and in 1994, Chief, Vaccine Research and Development, WHO Global Program for Vaccines and Immunization. He was then deeply involved in co-ordination of research aiming at the development of vaccines against diseases of major importance in developing countries. Paul-Henri Lambert is author or co-author of 436 publications, member of several international scientific boards, foreign member of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Belgium and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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