The Violence of Peace: America's Wars in the Age of Obama

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Beast Books, Jan 11, 2011 - Political Science - 272 pages
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"The man who many considered the peace candidate in the last election was transformed into a war president," writes bestselling author and leading academic Stephen l. Carter in The Violence of Peace, his new book decoding what President Barack Obama's views on war mean for America and its role in military conflict, now and going forward. As America winds down a war in Iraq, ratchets up another in Afghanistan, and continues a global war on terrorism, Carter delves into the implications of the military philosophy Obama has adopted through his first two years in office. Responding to the invitation that Obama himself issued in his Nobel address, Carter uses the tools of the Western tradition of just and unjust war to evaluate Obama's actions and words about military conflict, offering insight into how the president will handle existing and future wars, and into how his judgment will shape America's fate. Carter also explores war as a way to defend others from tyrannical regimes, which Obama has endorsed but not yet tested, and reveals the surprising ways in which some of the tactics Obama has used or authorized are more extreme than those of his predecessor, George W. Bush. "Keeping the nation at peace," Carter writes, "often requires battle," and this book lays bare exactly how America's wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are shaping the way Obama views the country's role in conflict and peace, ultimately determining the fate of the nation.
 

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User Review  - nmele - LibraryThing

Carter examines the conduct of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and of the War against Terror, in light of the Catholic just war tradition. His analysis and comments are objective, insightful and ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
57
III
119
IV
169
appendix
191
authors note
203
notes
205
index
245
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About the author (2011)

Stephen L. Carter is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale, where he has taught for almost thirty years. He is the author of four bestselling novels, including The Emperor of Ocean Park (2002), and seven acclaimed works of nonfiction. Among his nonfiction books are The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion (1993); Civility: Manners, Morals and the Etiquette of Democracy (1998); and God's Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics (2000). He lives with his family in Connecticut.

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