The Virginian: A Horseman of the Plains

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Macmillan, 1919 - American fiction - 423 pages
 

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I first read Owen Wister's "The Virginian: A Horseman of the Plains" when I was in junior high school. I liked it, but felt it was a somewhat idealized version of the period and the lead character., Some years later, though, after I had spent considerable time traveling the West - and much of the world - with a number of former cowhands, I reread the novel and discovered not only had Owen Wister gotten the lead character dead right - down to even the smallest of details, but that he had to have gone through much of what I had just experienced to have written the Virginian. Time after time he describe an incident - or a moment - that was identical to what I had experienced. 

Contents

I
1
III
8
V
26
VII
36
VIII
49
X
53
XI
69
XII
73
XXV
189
XXVI
194
XXVII
209
XXVIII
219
XXIX
229
XXX
234
XXXI
248
XXXII
266

XIII
78
XIV
87
XVI
100
XVII
112
XVIII
121
XIX
130
XX
136
XXI
143
XXII
167
XXIII
173
XXIV
183
XXXIII
297
XXXIV
300
XXXV
314
XXXVI
327
XXXVII
337
XXXVIII
355
XXXIX
368
XL
374
XLI
406
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