The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volumes 1-11; Volume 12, Parts 1-3; Volumes 13-16; Volume 17, Parts 1-2; Volume 18; Volume 19, Parts 1-2; Volumes 20-22; Volume 23, Parts 1-2; Volume 24, Parts 1-3; Volume 25, Parts 1-2; Volume 26, Parts 1-2; Volume 27, Parts 1-3; Volume 28, Parts 1-2; Volume 29, Parts 1-2; Volume 30; Volume 31, Parts 1-3; Volume 32, Parts 1-3; Volume 33; Volume 34, Parts 1-4; Volume 35, Parts 1-2; Volume 36, Parts 1-3; Volume 37, Parts 1-2; Volume 38, Parts 1-5; Volume 39, Parts 1-3; Volume 40, Parts 1-3; Volume 41, Parts 1-4; Volume 42, Parts 1-3; Volume 43, Parts 1-2; Volume 44; Volume 45, Parts 1-2; Volume 46, Parts 1-3; Volume 47, Parts 1-3; Volume 48, Parts 1-2; Volume 49, Parts 1-2; Volume 50, Parts 1-2; Volume 51, Parts 1-2; Volumes 52-53; Volume 56; Volumes 58-59; Volume 62; Volume 81; Volume 83; Volumes 101-102; Volumes 118-121; Volumes 124-125

Front Cover
Found also in the House Miscellaneous documents of the 52 to the 56th Congress./ Each number has special index. Inserted in each volume: Additions and corrections ... Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1902./ Series 1,v. 1-53, series 3,v. 1-5, and series 4,v. 1-3 include "Alternate designations of organizations mentioned." /Vol 54-55 of series 1 (serial no. 112-113)"HAVE NOT BEEN PUBLISHED, AND NO MATERIAL FOR THEM IS IN HAND." cf. General Index, p. xi. Series 2,v. 1 (serial no. 114) with imprint 1894, was not issued until 1898./ Edited in the War Records Office, 1880-July 1899; in the Record and Pension Office, July 1899-1901 Robert N. Scott compiled and edited v. 1-18, 1880-87, and also collected the greater part of the material for v. 19-36, 1887-91. After his death in 1887 the work was continued by Henry M. Lazelle, 1887-89, and by a board of publication, 1889-99, consisting of George B. Davis, 1889-97, Leslie J. Perry, 1889-99, Joseph W. Kirkley, 1889-99,and Fred C. Ainsworth, 1898-99; from 1889-1901 edited by Fred C. Ainsworth and Joseph W. Kirkley. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by Cornell University is available from Cornell University's Making of America Web Site.
 

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Page 56 - That the force to be left to cover Washington shall be such as to give an entire feeling of security for its safety from menace.
Page 40 - The next resistance will be near the English Bend, where there are some earthen batteries. Here it may be necessary for you to land your troops and co-operate with the naval attack, although it is more than probable that the navy unassisted can accomplish the result. If these works are taken the city of New Orleans necessarily falls. In that event it will probably be best to occupy Algiers with the mass of your troops, also the eastern bank of the river above the city.
Page 46 - Monroe (the place of departure having been changed, which caused delay,) 121,500 men, 14,592 animals, 1,150 wagons, 44 batteries, 74 ambulances, besides pontoon bridges, telegraph materials, and the enormous quantity of equipage, &c., required for an army of such magnitude. The only loss of which I have heard is eight mules and nine barges, which latter went ashore in a gale within a few miles of Fort Monroe — the cargoes being saved.
Page 50 - That no more than two army corps (about fifty thousand troops) of said Army of the Potomac shall be moved en route for a new base of operations until the navigation of the Potomac from Washington to the Chesapeake Bay shall be freed from enemy's batteries and other obstructions, or until the President shall hereafter give express permission.
Page 7 - It is intended to overcome this difficulty by the partial operations suggested, and such others as the particular case may require. We must endeavor to seize places on the railways in the rear of the enemy's points of concentration, and we must threaten their seaboard cities, in order that each State may be forced, by the necessity of its own defence, to diminish its contingent to the Confederate army.
Page 356 - SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, I...
Page 42 - In fact, would it not be less valuable in this, that it would break no great line of the enemy's communications, while mine would? Fifth. In case of disaster, would not a retreat be more difficult by your plan than mine?
Page 641 - President and a unanimous cabinet express their own and the nation's sympathy in his personal affliction, and their profound sense of the important public services rendered by him to his country during his long and brilliant career, among which will ever be gratefully distinguished his faithful devotion to the Constitution, the Union, and the flag when assailed by parricidal rebellion. "ABRAHAM LINCOLN.
Page 39 - If the military suggestions I have made in this letter prove to have been founded on erroneous data, you are of course perfectly free to change the plans of operations. " Brigadier General DC BUELL, " Commanding Department of the Ohio" " HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, " Washington, February 14, 1862.
Page 41 - That all other forces, both land and naval, with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obey additional orders when duly given. That the heads of departments, and especially the Secretaries of War and of the Navy, with all their subordinates, and the generalin-chief, with all other...