The Watchful Eye: American Justice in the Age of the Television Trial

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Praeger, Jan 1, 1994 - Law - 239 pages
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"According to Thaler, the presence of cameras in the courtroom is a pervasive technology that can affect public perceptions of the judicial process, change the behavior and attitudes of trial participants, and ultimately transform the sober process of justice into a media event designed for maximum public exposure. The author has interviewed more than 50 people - prominent journalists, academics, and members of the legal system - and brought together their observations in a fascinating historical and psychological profile of the televised courtroom. Thaler provides a historical overview and theoretical perspective, and discusses the new cable courtroom network and the current and continuing camera debate in New York State. He makes reference to the recent celebrated cases involving Amy Fisher, William Kennedy Smith, and Rodney King, then turns to an in-depth case study of the Joel Steinberg murder trial, including insights from the presiding judge, trial attorneys, witnesses, jurors, and the defendant himself, as well as journalists who covered the trial. The author concludes that the process of justice is slowly being turned into an entertainment vehicle, not unlike the show trials of bygone eras."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Contents

The Theater of the Television Trial
3
The Early Years
19
Claus von Bulow William Kennedy Smith and the L A Police
33
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

PAUL THALER is the Director of Journalism and Media at Mercy College in New York, a post he has held since 1982.

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