The Waverley Novels: With the Author's Last Corrections and Additions, Volume 3

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Carey & Hart, 1844
 

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Page 52 - After this, amid a crowd of lords and ladies, yet so disposed around her that she could see and be seen on all sides, came Elizabeth herself, then in the prime of womanhood, and in the full glow of what in a Sovereign was called beauty, and who would in the lowest rank of life have been truly judged a noble figure, joined to a striking and commanding physiognomy.
Page 52 - Nay, I told you as much before," said Blount; "do, I pray you, my dear Walter, let us take boat and return." "Not till I see the queen come forth," returned the youth composedly.
Page 52 - Thus the adventurous youth stood full in Elizabeth's eye — an eye never indifferent to the admiration which she deservedly excited among her subjects, or to the fair proportions of external form which chanced to distinguish any of her courtiers. Accordingly, she fixed her keen glance...
Page 52 - The young cavalier we have so often mentioned had probably never yet approached so near the person of his Sovereign, and he pressed forward as far as the line of warders permitted, in order to avail himself of the present opportunity. His companion, on the contrary...
Page 53 - And here," she added, giving him a jewel of gold in the form of a chessman, " I give thee this to wear at the collar.
Page 51 - It was even so. The royal barge, manned with the queen's watermen, richly attired in the regal liveries, and having the banner of England displayed, did, indeed, lie at the great stairs which ascended from the river, and along with it two or three other boats for transporting such part of her retinue as were not in immediate attendance on the royal person.

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