The Waverley Novels: With the Author's Last Corrections and Additions, Volume 2

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Carey & Hart, 1844
 

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Page 94 - Why art thou cast down, 0 my soul ? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope in God : for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God.
Page 117 - Leddyship to have pity on a poor misguided young creature," in tones so affecting, that, like the notes of some of her native songs, provincial vulgarity was lost in pathos. "Stand up, young woman...
Page 10 - One large stone only had found its way to the bottom, and in stopping the course of a small brook, which glided smoothly round the foot of the eminence, gave, by its opposition, a feeble voice of murmur to the placid and elsewhere silent streamlet. The human figures which completed this landscape were in number two, partaking, in their dress and appearance, of that wild and rustic character which belonged to the woodlands of the West Riding of Yorkshire at that early period.
Page 26 - The prospect, in its general outline, commands a close-built, high-piled city, stretching itself out beneath in a form which, to a romantic imagination, may be supposed to represent that of a dragon; — now a noble arm of the sea, with its rocks, isles, distant shores, and boundary of mountains ; and now a fair and fertile champaign country, varied with hill, dale, and rock, and skirted by the picturesque ridge of the Pentland Mountains.
Page 32 - To extricate himself from the stirrups and fallen steed. was to the Templar scarce the work of a moment; and stung with madness, both at his disgrace and at the acclamations with which it was hailed by the spectators, he drew his sword and waved it in defiance of his conqueror. The Disinherited Knight sprung from his steed, and also unsheathed his sword.
Page 45 - Thou canst not mend that shot, Locksley,' said the Prince, with an insulting smile. 'I will notch his shaft for him, however,' replied Locksley. And letting fly his arrow with a little more precaution than before, it lighted right upon that of his competitor, which it split to shivers. The people who stood around were so astonished at his wonderful dexterity that they could not even give vent to their surprise in their usual clamour. 'This must be the devil, and no man of flesh and blood,' whispered...
Page 45 - I will crave your Grace's permission to plant such a mark as is used in the North Country; and welcome every brave yeoman who shall try a shot at it to win a smile from the bonny lass he loves best." He then turned to leave the lists. "Let your guards attend me," he said, " if you please ; I go but to cut a rod from the next willow-bush.
Page 32 - Templar aimed at the centre of his antagonist's shield, and struck it so fair and forcibly that his spear went to shivers, and the Disinherited Knight reeled in his saddle. On the other hand, that champion had in the beginning of his career directed the point of his...

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