The Waverley Novels: With the Author's Last Corrections and Additions, Volume 4

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Carey & Hart, 1847
 

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Page 36 - if you be so much distressed in mind, you may speak to our minister of the parish; he is a douce man, regards the honour of our family, and the mair that he may look for some patronage from me.
Page 36 - I will send you to your master, the devil, with the help of a tarbarrel and a torch ! " "I intend to delate mysell to the Presbytery," said Steenie, "and tell them all I have seen last night, whilk are things fitter for them to judge of than a borrel man like me.
Page 36 - We were best ask Hutcheon,' said my gudesire; 'he kens a' the odd corners about as weel as — another serving-man that is now gane, and that I wad not like to name.' Aweel, Hutcheon, when he was asked, told them that a ruinous turret, lang disused, next to the clock-house, only accessible by a ladder, for the opening was on the outside, and far above the battlements, was called of old the Cat's Cradle. 'There will I go immediately...
Page 33 - Hutcheon had nae will to the wark, but he had stood by Dougal in battle and broil, and he wad not fail him at this pinch ; so down the carles sat ower a stoup of brandy, and Hutcheon, who was something of a clerk, would have read a chapter of the Bible; but Dougal would hear naething but a blaud of Davie Lindsay, whilk was the waur preparation. When midnight came, and the house was quiet as the grave, sure...
Page 65 - Highlanders, and so forth, the company began to draw together towards the spot where the seats prepared for them, and the screen drawn in front of the bosky stage, induced them to assemble, and excited expectation, especially as a scroll in front of the esplanade set forth, in the words of the play, "This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn brake our tiringhouse, and we will do it in action.
Page 34 - So am I, Stephen," said his honour, "and so are all the folks in the house, I hope. But if there be a knave amongst us, it must be he that tells the story he cannot prove." He paused, and then added, mair sternly, " If I understand your trick, sir, you want to take advantage of some malicious reports concerning things in this family, and particularly respecting my father's sudden death, thereby to cheat me out of the money, and perhaps take away my character, by insinuating that I have received the...
Page 36 - although this vision of yours tends, on the whole, to my father's credit, as an honest man, that he should, even after his death, desire to see justice done to a poor man like you, yet you are sensible that ill-dispositioned men might make bad constructions upon it, concerning his soul's health. So, I think, we had better lay the haill dirdum on that illdeedie creature, Major Weir, and say naething about your dream in the wood of Pitmurkie.
Page 33 - Steenie," quoth the Laird, sighing deeply, and putting his napkin to his een, "his was a sudden call, and he will be missed in the country; no time to set his house in order -weel prepared...
Page 36 - Will your honour please to see if that bit line is right? ' Sir John looked at every line, and at every letter, with much attention; and at last, at the date, which my gudesire had not observed: 'From my appointed place,' he read, 'this twenty-fifth of November.
Page 32 - He was knighted at Lonon Court, wi' the king's ain sword ; and being a red-hot prelatist, he came down here, rampauging like a lion, with commissions of lieutenancy (and of lunacy, for what I ken), to put down a' the Whigs and Covenanters in the country. Wild wark they made of it ; for the Whigs were as dour as the Cavaliers were fierce, and it was which should first tire the other. Redgauntlet was aye for the strong hand ; and his name is kend as wide in the country as Claverhouse's or Tarn Dalyell's.

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