The Way the Wind Blows: Climate, History, and Human Action

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Columbia University Press, 2000 - Science - 413 pages
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Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference.

Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

 

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Contents

Chapter
1
Chapter 2
45
the barometric pressures at Djakarta Indonesia and those
51
pronounced seasonal and decadescale variability
63
paleoclimate study transect PEP1 as well as climate
70
Chapter 3
89
Chapter 4
121
Chapter 5
141
Linking Time and Space with
193
Chapter 8
209
Chapter 9
223
Historical Consciousness
271
Chapter 11
301
Chapter 12
331
Chapter 13
357
Index
385

Memories Abstractions and Conceptualization of Ecological
181

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About the author (2000)

Roderick J. McIntosh is professor of anthropology at Rice University.

Joseph A. Tainter is project leader of Cultural Heritage Research at the Rocky Mountain Research Station.

Susan Keech McIntosh is professor of anthropology at Rice University and the director of Scientia: an institute for the history of science and culture.

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