The Welfare State: A General Theory

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SAGE, Jun 2, 2000 - Social Science - 208 pages
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A major orginal work of social theory, this book presents a distinctive and tightly argued theoretical model for understanding the basis of welfare in society.

The author develops a theory of welfare based on a series of basic propositions: that people live in society and have obligations to each other; that welfare is obtained and maintained through social action; and that the welfare state is a means of promoting and maintaining welfare in society. Each of these propositions is examined and developed to suggest a clear way of understanding the foundations of social welfare.

The book make a lively and informative contribution to debates in social policy, as well as moral philosophy, political theory and social theory.

 

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Contents

Method
1
Part I People and Society
9
Chapter I1 The Person
10
Chapter I2 Society
22
Chapter I3 Solidarity
37
Chapter I4 The Moral Community
55
Part II Welfare
71
Chapter II1 The Nature of Welfare
72
Chapter II4 Welfare and Redistribution
106
Part III The State and Welfare
121
Chapter III1 The Role of the State
122
Chapter III2 The Welfare States
133
Chapter III3 Social Policy
151
Chapter III4 State Action
161
Summary of the Argument
178
Afterword
188

Chapter II2 The Preconditions for Welfare
83
Chapter II3 Social Protection
94

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About the author (2000)

Paul Spicker is Senior Lecturer in Social Policy at the University of Dundee. He is the author of a number of leading texts in social policy, including Principles of Social Welfare (1988) and Social Policy (1995).

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