The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, Band 6

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Longmans, Green, 1915
 

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Seite 49 - What is wanted and what is necessary to stop a panic is to diffuse the impression, that though money may be dear, still money is to be had.
Seite 68 - England) or for any other persons whatsoever, united or to be united in covenants or partnerships, exceeding the number of six persons, in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand, or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof.
Seite 165 - The calling is hereditary ; the credit of the bank descends from father to son : this inherited wealth soon brings inherited refinement. Banking is a watchful, but not a laborious trade. A banker, even in large business, can feel pretty sure that all his transactions are sound, and yet have much spare mind. A certain part of his time, and a considerable part of his thoughts, he can readily devote to other pursuits. And a London banker can also have the most intellectual society in the world if he...
Seite 15 - In modern English business, owing to the certainty of obtaining loans on discount of bills or otherwise at a moderate rate of interest, there is a steady bounty on trading with borrowed capital, and a constant discouragement to confine yourself solely or mainly to your own capital.
Seite 42 - The way in which the panic of 1825 was stopped by advancing money has been described in so broad and graphic a way that the passage has become classical. ' We lent it,' said Mr. Harman, on behalf of the Bank of England, ' by every possible means and in modes we had never adopted before ; we took in stock on security, we purchased Exchequer bills...
Seite 87 - During the interval between the Restoration and the Revolution the riches of the nation had been rapidly increasing. Thousands of busy men found every Christmas that, after the expenses of the year's housekeeping had been defrayed out of the year's income, a surplus remained ; and how that surplus was to be employed was a question of some difficulty. In our time, to invest such a surplus, at something more than three per cent, on the best security that has ever been known in the world, is the work...
Seite 88 - ... increased, had by no means increased so fast as the quantity of capital which was seeking for employment. Many, too, wished to put their money where they could find it at an hour's notice, and looked about for some species of property which could be more readily transferred than a house or a field.
Seite 164 - London Banker ' had especially a charmed value. He was supposed to represent, and often did represent, a certain union of pecuniary sagacity and educated refinement which was scarcely to be found in any other part of society. In a time when the trading classes were much ruder than they now are, many private bankers possessed variety of knowledge and a delicacy of attainment which would even now be very rare.
Seite 15 - English trade is carried on upon borrowed capital to an extent of which few foreigners have an idea, and none of our ancestors could have conceived. In every district small traders have arisen who "discount their bills" largely, and with the capital so borrowed, harass and press upon, if they do not eradicate, the old capitalist. The new trader has obviously an immense advantage in the struggle of trade. If a merchant have £50,000...
Seite 13 - A million in the hands of a single banker is a great power ; he can at once lend it where he will, &nd borrowers can come to him, because they know or believe that he has it. But the same sum scattered in tens and fifties through a whole nation is no power at all : no one knows where to find it or whom to ask for it.

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