The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Four Volumes Complete. With His Last Corrections, Additions, and Improvements. Carefully Collated and Compared with Former Editions: Together with Notes from the Various Critics and Commentators

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Editor, and sold, 1778
 

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Contents

Introduction to the Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus
63
The Speech of Cornelius over his Son at the Hour of
73
A Diſſertation upon Playthings
83
Rhetorick Logick and Metaphyſicks
93
Anatomy
102
The Caſe of a young Nobleman at Court with
111
Of the Seceſſion of Martinus and fome of his Travels
120
MARTINUS SCRIBLERUS or of the Art of SINKING in POETRY
129
Of the true Genius for the Profound and by what it is con
135
Of the fevera Kinds of Geniuſes in the Profund and
141
Of the Profund when it conſiſts in the Thought
143
Of Imitation and the Manner of imitating
149
of the magnifying and diminiſhing
157
A Project for the Advancement of the Bathos
170
Chap XVI A Projet for the Advancement of the Stage
178
Martini Seribleri Virgilius Reſtauratus
184
A Specimen of Scribleruss Reports
191
Of the Poet Laureate
205
4 11 40 61 91 92 173 21
244
Preface to the Works of Shakeſpear
270
Of Mr Drydens Death his moral Character the Poets
289
Some Reaſons why Friendſhips may be contracted by Perſons
295
From Mr Wycherley
301
On the ſame and further Propoſals for correcting them
304
From Mr Wycherley
306
More concerning Corrections of the Poems
308
From Mr Wycherley after his Illneſs
309
From Mr Wycherley
310
From Mr Wycherley concerning the Miſcellanies and the Critics
311
Concerning Miſcellanies and the Danger of young Poets
312
From Mr Wycherley
316
More about the Poems
318
Corrections ſent
319
From Mr Wycherley In Anſwer to the Account of the State of his Papers
322
LETTERS to and from W WALSH Eſq from the Year 1705
323
Mr Walſh to Mr Pope concerning paſtoral and paſtoral Comedy
324

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Page 347 - HAPPY the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground ; Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in Summer yield him shade, In Winter fire.
Page 347 - ... shade. In winter fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years slide soft away. In health of body, peace of mind, Quiet by day. Sound sleep by night; study and ease, Together mixt; sweet recreation: And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 176 - To make an Episode. Take any remaining adventure of your former collection in which you could no way involve your hero, or any unfortunate accident that was too good to be thrown away, and it will be of use applied to any other person, who may be lost and evaporate in the course of the work without the least damage to the composition.
Page 404 - To eat Westphalia ham in a morning; ride over hedges and ditches on borrowed hacks; come home in the heat of the day with a fever, and (what...
Page 250 - Homer makes us hearers, and Virgil leaves us readers. If in the next place we take a view of the sentiments, the same presiding faculty is eminent in the sublimity and spirit of his thoughts. Longinus has given his opinion, that it was in this part Homer principally excelled.
Page 57 - OF manners gentle, of affections mild ; In wit a man, simplicity a child : With native humour temp'ring virtuous rage, Form'd to delight at once and lash the age : Above temptation in a low estate, And uncorrupted ev'n among the great : 6 A safe companion, and an easy friend, Unblam'd thro
Page 201 - Jerusalem with iniquity: the heads thereof judge for reward, and the priests thereof teach for hire, and the prophets thereof divine for money: yet will they lean upon the Lord, and say, "Is not the Lord among us? none evil can come upon us.
Page 347 - Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years, slide soft away In health of body; peace of mind; Quiet by day ; Sound sleep by night; study and ease Together mix'd; sweet recreation, And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 277 - Vati noceat . But however this contention might be carried on by the Partizans on either side, I cannot help thinking these two great Poets were good friends, and lived on amicable terms and in offices of society with each other.
Page 268 - I fay of the honour fo many of the Great have done me, while the...

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