The Works of Francis Bacon: Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Albans, and Lord High Chancellor of England, Volume 6

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Baynes and son, 1824 - English literature
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Page 405 - and sometimes shall adjudge them to be utterly void ; for when an act of parliament is against common right and reason, or repugnant or impossible to be performed, the common law shall control this, and adjudge such act to be void." And therefore in 8 E. 3. 30, Thomas Tregor's case, upon the statute of West 2.
Page 400 - 4. In Dr. Bonham's case, what he means by this passage, That in many cases the common law shall control acts of parliament, and sometimes shall judge them to be merely void: For where an act of parliament is against common right and reason, the law shall control it, and adjudge it void.
Page 396 - most obliged and humble servant, TOBIE MATTHEW. POSTSC. The most prodigious wit, that ever I knew of my nation, and of this side of the sea, is of your lordship's name, though he be known by another. TO THE LORD ARCHBISHOP OF YORK,
Page 47 - utlegatum upon my back! To which I only said he could not; and that he was at a fault; for he hunted upon an old scent. He gave me a number of disgraceful words besides ; which I answered with silence, and shewing, that I was not moved with them.
Page 52 - lost a great subject and a great servant. But if I should praise him in propriety, I should say, that he was a fit man to keep things from growing worse; but no very fit man to reduce things to be
Page 166 - Sir Edward Coke hath not forborne, by any engine, to heave at your honour, and at myself; and he works by the weightiest instrument, the earl of Buckingham, who, as I see, sets him as close to him as his shirt, the earl speaking in Sir Edward's praise, and, as it were, menacing in his spirit.
Page 278 - one way or other. And in troth, that which I fear most, is, lest continual attendance and business, together with these cares, and want of time to do my weak body right this spring by diet and physic, will cast me down ; and that it will be thought feigning, or fainting. But I hope in God 1 shall hold out.
Page 71 - the Attorney. FIRST, it will strengthen the king's causes greatly amongst the judges: for both my lord Coke will think himself near a privy counsellor's place, and thereupon turn obsequious; and the attorney-general, (a) Of chief justice of the Common Pleas, having been appointed to that office
Page 165 - trouble yourself with, I understand from London by some of my friends, that you have carried yourself with much scorn and neglect both toward myself and friends ; which, if it prove true, I blame not you, but myself, who was ever Your Lordship's assured friend, [July, 1617.] G. BUCKINGHAM.
Page 408 - meanors tending to the breach of the peace, or oppression of the subjects, or to the raising of faction or other misgovernment: so that no wrong or injury either public or private can be done, but it shall be reformed and punished by law. Being commanded to explain myself concerning these words, and principally concerning this word, misgovernment;

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