The Works of Francis Bacon, Volume 14

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Nov 24, 2011 - Literary Collections - 670 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), the English philosopher, statesman and jurist, is best known for developing the empiricist method which forms the basis of modern science. Bacon's writings concentrated on philosophy and judicial reform. His most significant work is the Instauratio Magna comprising two parts - The Advancement of Learning and the Novum Organum. The first part is noteworthy as the first major philosophical work published in English (1605). James Spedding (1808-81) and his co-editors arranged this fourteen-volume edition, published in London between 1857 and 1874, not in chronological order but by subject matter, so that different volumes would appeal to different audiences. The material is divided into three parts: philosophy and general literature; legal works; and letters, speeches and tracts relating to politics. Volume 14, published in 1874, contains Bacon's papers from 1619 until his death, including his will, papers about his impeachment, and his treatise on English laws.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

BOOK VII
1
Proposition of a Law for the regulation of usury 413
2
Judgment in the Lake and Exeter cause Suffolks answer in
8
CHAPTER II
16
IN Oxronn 18 February 161920
20
The King undertakes to act as mediator in the quarrel
28
Offer to the Count Palatine of the Crown of Bohemia
41
Proceedings in Star Chamber against some of the Dutch merchants
49
Method of judicial inquiry pursued by the Lords Its
245
Character of the House of Lords as Judge and Jury Case
273
CHAPTER VII
279
Negotiation to appease Buckingham Reports from Meautys
323
The condition on which Buckingham was appeased at last
334
CHAPTER VIII
348
Demur on the part of the Bishop of London
353
To MR TOBIE MATTHEW 27 March 1622
364

161920 NOVEMBERJUNE ETAT
60
Advantages of distributing the business of Government to stand
72
Pretermitted duties Commission for relief of the poor
80
To MR SECRETARY CALVERT 5 February 161920
81
Character of the Star Chamber as described by Coke and Bacon
90
CHAPTER IV
105
To ms vaar econ L THE MAaQUIs or BUcKINGnAM L
110
Preparations for Parliament
123
Sir H Yelverton called to answer in the Star Chamber
133
Proceeding in the Star Chamber against Yelverton OPENING
136
CHAPTER V
160
Prosperity of Bacous personal fortunes To be creat ed Viscount
166
Grant of two subsidies without reference to the Palatinate 0
179
Athird conference between the Houses for the production of
202
CHAPTER VI
209
A second complaint of the same kind The Commons desire
215
The Lord Treasurers report of the Conference Charge of bribery
221
Reviews records of analogous cases
231
Plan of the argument
370
To THE MARQUIS or BUcKINGHAM 4 Aug 1622
378
Death of the Provost of Eton Suit to succeed him
406
Toby Matthew joins the party at Madrid Suit for the Provost
420
Expected conclusion of the marriage treaty The Infanta
430
The Provostship of Eton given to Sir H Wotton Suit for
451
Causes of the failure of the warpolicy Indifference of
505
CHAPTER X
511
N 0 letters preserved written during the next 6 months Publica
523
Failure of Mansfeldts attempt to reconquer the Palatinate
527
Recovery from another severe illness Correspondence with
533
Baeons relations with his wife
539
Bacons mode of doing business as a Judge in Chancery
562
APPENDIX
579
List of papers entered in Robert Stephenss catalogue to which
589
Index to Vol VII
595
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Francis Bacon was born on October 28, 1909. He was born in Dublin, Ireland, to parents of British decent but lived with his nanny, Jessie Lightfoot, for many of his formative years. Bacon began painting in his early 20s and worked only sporadically until his mid-30s. He lived between England and Ireland for many years, earning his money by becoming an interior decorator and a designer of furniture and rugs. In 1944 he created his breakthrough oil painting entitled, Three Studies for Figures at the Base of the Crucifixion. The work is said to have been competed within the timeframe of two weeks. The painting was immediately seen as a sensation and established him as an important post-war artist. Bacon himself insisted that no retrospective of his work should include anything produced prior to 1944. Bacon was plagued with chronic asthma which developed into a respiratory condition. He died of cardiac arrest on April 28, 1992. He left his entire estate to his companion, John Edwards, who then donated the contents of Bacon's studio to the Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin.