The Works of Francis Bacon, Volume 13

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 24, 2011 - Literary Collections - 520 pages
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Francis Bacon (1561-1626), the English philosopher, statesman and jurist, is best known for developing the empiricist method which forms the basis of modern science. Bacon's writings concentrated on philosophy and judicial reform. His most significant work is the Instauratio Magna comprising two parts - The Advancement of Learning and the Novum Organum. The first part is noteworthy as the first major philosophical work published in English (1605). James Spedding (1808-81) and his co-editors arranged this fourteen-volume edition, published in London between 1857 and 1874, not in chronological order but by subject matter, so that different volumes would appeal to different audiences. The material is divided into three parts: philosophy and general literature; legal works; and letters, speeches and tracts relating to politics. Volume 13, published in 1872, contains Bacon's papers from 1616 to 1618 and relate to his appointment as Lord Chancellor, and England's relations with Ireland and Spain.
 

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Contents

OF THE SIXTH VOLUME
1
4 Proclamation ordering the gentry from London into the country
4
Villiers established as Favourite Asks Bacon for advice
9
1616 JETAT
57
State of the clothtrade
71
Patent for Inns Murder of Sir John Tindal Ropers 0IIlC6
98
Villierss private estate
115
Clement Dawheneys patent called in and referred to Bacon
135
A MEMORIAL Fou Youn Munsrr 27 September or there
254
Ordinance for the constitution of reporters for law cases
262
Death of Winwood 27 Oct 1617 Restoration of Lady Hat
271
To Sm HENRY YELVERTON ATTORNEY GENERAL 19
291
Public charge to be given to the Judges and Justices on the last
299
CHAPTER VII
309
Bacon created Baron Verulam of Verulam 12 July 1618
316
Chief Justice Posterity in favour of the rioters The King
322

Further correspondence with the University on the petition
141
Resignation of the Lord Chancellor Bacon made Lord Keeper
151
Progress of the Spanish match
157
HAM 19 April 1617
169
Bacon takes his seat in the Court of Chancery 7 May 1617
181
To THE RIGHT REvEREND THE FATHER IN GoD THE BIsHoP
193
Bacon troubled with gout Popular apprehension that he will
200
Recommendation of Mr Lowder the Queens Solicitor for one
207
Return of Tobie Matthew to England who remains under
214
Opposition of his wife to the match and disputes between
223
To THE EARL or Buoxmcnzuu 23 August 1617
242
Account of Bacons receipts and disbursements from 24 June
336
To THE KING 18 October 1618
361
Warrant to prepare for death Execution granted by the Kings
369
To THE MARQUIS or BUCKINGHAM 12 November 1618
375
A DECLARATION or THE DEMEANOR AND CARRIAGE or
384
Two points on which the oflicial Declaration has been charged
427
Buekinghams letters in favour of Dr Steward Account of
441
Proceedings of Lord Ormondes son in Ireland Business
448
Index to Vol VI
455
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Francis Bacon was born on October 28, 1909. He was born in Dublin, Ireland, to parents of British decent but lived with his nanny, Jessie Lightfoot, for many of his formative years. Bacon began painting in his early 20s and worked only sporadically until his mid-30s. He lived between England and Ireland for many years, earning his money by becoming an interior decorator and a designer of furniture and rugs. In 1944 he created his breakthrough oil painting entitled, Three Studies for Figures at the Base of the Crucifixion. The work is said to have been competed within the timeframe of two weeks. The painting was immediately seen as a sensation and established him as an important post-war artist. Bacon himself insisted that no retrospective of his work should include anything produced prior to 1944. Bacon was plagued with chronic asthma which developed into a respiratory condition. He died of cardiac arrest on April 28, 1992. He left his entire estate to his companion, John Edwards, who then donated the contents of Bacon's studio to the Hugh Lane Gallery in Dublin.