The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 1

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1803 - France
 

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Page 250 - And ever, against eating cares, Lap me in soft Lydian airs, Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce, In notes with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony ; That Orpheus...
Page 133 - Without all doubt, the torments which we may be made to suffer are much greater in their effect on the body and mind, than any pleasures which the most learned voluptuary could suggest, or than the liveliest imagination, and the most sound and exquisitely sensible body, could enjoy.
Page 285 - I could observe, much in the following manner: the head reclines something on one side ; the eyelids are more closed than usual, and the eyes roll gently with an inclination to the object; the mouth is a little opened, and the breath drawn slowly, with now and then a low sigh ; the whole body is composed, and the hands fall idly to the sides. All this is accompanied with an inward sense of melting and languor.
Page 95 - ON a superficial view, we may seem to differ very widely from each other in our reasonings, and no less in our pleasures : but notwithstanding this difference, which I think to be rather apparent than real, it is probable that the standard /both of reason and taste is the same in all human creatures.
Page 171 - Will he make many supplications unto thee? Will he speak soft words unto thee? Will he make a covenant with thee? Wilt thou take him for a servant for ever?
Page 150 - Now whatever either on good or upon bad grounds tends to raise a man in his own opinion, produces a sort of swelling and triumph that is extremely grateful to the human mind; and this swelling is never more perceived, nor operates with more force, than when without danger we are conversant with terrible objects, the mind always claiming to itself some part of the dignity and importance of the things which it contemplates.
Page 98 - I mean by the word Taste no more than that faculty or those faculties of the mind, which are affected with, or which form a judgment of, the works of imagination and the elegant arts.
Page 97 - A definition may be very exact, and yet go but a very little way towards informing us of the nature of the thing defined; but let the virtue of a definition be what it will, in the order of things, it seems rather to follow than to precede our inquiry, of which it ought to be considered as the result.
Page 317 - Certain it is, that the influence of most things on our passions is not so much from the things themselves, as from our opinions concerning them ; and these again depend very much on the opinions of other men, conveyable for the most part by words only.
Page 71 - Indeed, the blindness of one part of mankind co-operating with the frenzy and villany of the other, has been the real builder of this respectable fabric of political society; and as the blindness of mankind has caused their slavery, in return their state of slavery is...

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