The World of W.E.B. Du Bois: A Quotation Sourcebook

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1992 - History - 282 pages

W.E.B. Du Bois was one of the leading activist men of letters in 20th-century America. Du Bois organized, protested, laid out programs, petitioned, and raised questions of long-term strategy and short-term tactics. He wrote detailed scholarly investigations, Souls of Black Folk and Black Reconstruction among them, as well as popular current articles. He was a commanding speaker and a prodigious correspondent. And yet, it was not until the 1980s that his complete writings became available.

The World of W.E.B. Du Bois was created to provide a short journey through his views on virtually all aspects of 20th-century life. More than 1,000 quotations from his published writings and correspondence are provided. These are grouped into 19 topical and one miscellaneous chapter. Each quote begins with a heading designed to summarize the main sense of the quotation. A subject index provides additional access to the ideas of this complex figure. Essential reading for all involved in American race relations and intellectual history and American and Black Studies.

 

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The world of W. E. B. Du Bois: a quotation sourcebook

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The major thoughts, ideas, predictions, and judgments from DuBois's voluminous published and unpublished writings have been selected, arranged, classified, and indexed in this work. Following an ... Read full review

Contents

Through a Personal Prism
9
The Trouble Ive Seen
31
Mother Africa
43
Education
53
Racism
79
Working Class
91
Forced Labor
101
Ruling and Other Classes
109
Christianity
161
Jews
173
White People
185
World Economy and Politics
189
War and Peace
199
Some Other Countries
205
Politics
215
General
223

Women
125
Ideals and Realities
129
Literature
137
Reform Radicalism and Revolution
145
References
261
Index
265
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Page 12 - On mountain and valley, in home and school, I met men and women as I had never met them before. Slowly they became, not white folks, but folks. The unity beneath all life clutched me. I was not less fanatically a Negro, but " Negro " meant a greater, broader sense of humanity and world-fellowship.

About the author (1992)

MEYER WEINBERG is Professor Emeritus at the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He is the author or compiler of numerous works dealing with education and race/ethnicity issues.

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