The Writer, 31-32. sējumi

Pirmais vāks
The Writer, 1919
0 Atsauksmes
Atsauksmes netiek pārbaudītas, taču Google meklē viltus saturu un noņem to, ja tāds tiek identificēts.
 

Lietotāju komentāri - Rakstīt atsauksmi

Ierastajās vietās neesam atraduši nevienu atsauksmi.

Citi izdevumi - Skatīt visu

Bieži izmantoti vārdi un frāzes

Populāri fragmenti

50. lappuse - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether I went over by the ladder, as first contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which I...
65. lappuse - Such people there are living and flourishing in the world— Faithless, Hopeless, Charityless; let us have at them, dear friends, with might and main. Some there are, and very successful too, mere quacks and fools: and it was to combat and expose such as those, no doubt, that laughter was...
48. lappuse - It's no in books, it's no in lear, To make us truly blest : If happiness hae not her seat And centre in the breast, We may be wise, or rich, or great, But never can be blest...
35. lappuse - THE WANING MOON AND like a dying lady, lean and pale, Who totters forth, wrapt in a gauzy veil, Out of her chamber, led by the insane And feeble wanderings of her fading brain, The moon arose up in the murky east, A white and shapeless mass.
50. lappuse - ... in such costume always look in an unfinished and incomplete state without a set of fetters to garnish them. He had a brown hat on his head, and a dirty belcher handkerchief round his neck, with the long frayed ends of which he smeared the beer from his face as he spoke : disclosing, when he had done so, a broad heavy countenance with a beard of three days...
118. lappuse - Nothing is more clear than that every plot, worth the name, must be elaborated to its denouement before anything be attempted with the pen. It is only with the denouement constantly in view that we can give a plot its indispensable air of consequence, or causation, by making the incidents, and especially the tone at all points, tend to the development of the intention.
66. lappuse - Miss Crawley was, in consequence, an object of great respect when she came to Queen's Crawley, for she had a balance at her banker's which would have made her beloved anywhere. 'What a dignity it gives an old lady, that balance at the banker's!
38. lappuse - ... separated from them by a series of six or seven generations; for, throughout that chain of ancestry, every successive mother has transmitted to her child a fainter bloom, a more delicate and briefer beauty, and a slighter physical frame, if not a character of less force and solidity, than her own.
66. lappuse - ! Your wife is perpetually sending her little testimonies of affection, your little girls work endless worsted baskets cushions, and footstools for her. What a good fire there is in her room when she comes to pay you a visit, although your wife laces her stays without one ! The house during her stay assumes a festive, neat, warm, jovial, snug appearance not visible at other seasons.
4. lappuse - Was that very sin — into which Adam precipitated himself and all his race — was it the destined means by which, over a long pathway of toil and sorrow, we are to attain a higher, brighter, and profounder happiness, than our lost birthright gave? Will not this idea account for the permitted existence of sin, as no other theory can?

Bibliogrāfiskā informācija