The Writings of Benjamin Franklin, Volume 9

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1906 - Electronic books - 719 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 189 - I did not understand him, till I felt my head hit against the beam. He was a man that never missed any occasion of giving instruction; and upon this he said to me, " You are young, and have the world before you; STOOP as you go through it, and you will miss many hard thumps.
Page 188 - Good,' which I think was written by your father. It had been so little regarded by a former possessor, that several leaves of it were torn out ; but the remainder gave me such a turn of thinking, as to have an influence on my conduct through life ; for I have always set a greater value on the character of a doer of good than any other kind of reputation ; and if I have been, as you seem to think, a useful citizen, the public owes the advantage of it to that book.
Page 146 - I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country ; he is a bird of bad moral character ; he does not get his living honestly. You may have seen him perched on some dead tree, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the...
Page 136 - Five thousand balloons, capable of raising two men each, could not cost more than five ships of the line; and where is the prince who can afford so to cover his country with troops for its defence, as that ten thousand men descending from the clouds might not in many places do an infinite deal of mischief, before a force could be brought together to repel them...
Page 565 - I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth, that GOD governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without his notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without his aid? We have been assured, sir, in the sacred writings that "except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it.
Page 565 - I also believe that without His concurring aid we shall succeed in this political building no better than the builders of Babel. We shall be divided by our little partial local interests; our projects will be confounded, and we ourselves shall become a reproach and byword down to future ages.
Page 564 - In this situation of this assembly, groping, as it were, in the dark, to find political truth, and scarce able to distinguish it when presented to us, how has it happened, sjr, that we have not hitherto once thought of humbly applying to the Father of lights to illuminate our understandings...
Page 565 - I live, the more convincing Proofs I see of this Truth, That God governs in the Affairs of Men, — And if a Sparrow cannot fall to the Ground without his Notice, is it probable that an Empire can rise without his Aid? — We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that except the Lord build the House, they labour in vain that build it.
Page 279 - ... in their persons nor shall their houses or goods be burnt or otherwise destroyed, nor their fields wasted by the armed force...
Page 583 - If it succeeds, I do not see why you might not in Europe carry the Project of good Henry the 4th into Execution, by forming a Federal Union and One Grand Republick of all its different States and Kingdoms, by means of a like Convention, for we had many Interests to reconcile.