The Writings of James Madison: 1783-1787

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1901 - United States
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Vol. II, 1783-1787, includes "Vices" and "Ancient & Modern Confederacies"

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The Writings of James Madison: Comprising His Public Papers and His Private Correspondence; Gaillard Hunt, Editor; G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1901; Volume II. 1783-1787

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Page 55 - Papers belonging to any of the said States, or their Citizens, which in the course of the War may have fallen into the hands of his Officers to be forthwith restored and delivered to the proper States and Persons to whom they belong.
Page 318 - Monday in May next a Convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several states be held at Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation...
Page 184 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 407 - What astonishing changes a few years are capable of producing. I am told that even respectable characters speak of a monarchical form of government without horror. From thinking proceeds speaking ; thence to acting is often but a single step.
Page 408 - Their creed is, that the property of the United States has been protected from the confiscation of Britain by the joint exertions of all, and therefore ought to be the common property of all; and he that attempts opposition to this creed, is an enemy to equity and justice, and ought to be swept from off the face of the earth.
Page 37 - The United States in congress assembled shall never engage in a war, nor grant letters of marque and reprisal in time of peace, nor enter into any treaties or alliances, nor coin money, nor regulate the value thereof, nor ascertain the sums and expenses necessary for the defence and welfare of the United States or any of them, nor emit bills, nor borrow money...
Page 55 - It is agreed that creditors on either side, shall meet with no lawful impediment to the recovery of the full value in sterling money, of all bona fide debts heretofore contracted.
Page 185 - Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the universe...
Page 290 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the Constitution of the Federal Government adequate to the exigencies of the Union...
Page 191 - Either we must say, that they may control the freedom of the press, may abolish the Trial by Jury, may swallow up the Executive and Judiciary Powers of the State; nay that they may despoil us of our very right of suffrage, and erect themselves into an independent and hereditary Assembly or, we must say, that they have no authority to enact into law the Bill under consideration.