The Writings of James Russell Lowell: Poems

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1896
 

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Page 64 - You steal Englishmen's books and think Englishmen's thought, With their salt on her tail your wild eagle is caught; Your literature suits its each whisper and motion To what will be thought of it over the ocean...
Page 167 - I stood and watched by the window The noiseless work of the sky, And the sudden flurries of snow-birds, Like brown leaves whirling by. I thought of a mound in sweet Auburn,* Where a little headstone stood, How the flakes were folding it gently, As did robins the babes in the wood. Up spoke our own little Mabel, Saying,
Page 51 - t is kindled o' nights With a semblance of flame by the chill Northern Lights. He may rank (Griswold says so) first bard of your nation, (There's no doubt that he stands in supreme iceolation,) Your topmost Parnassus he may set his heel on, But no warm applauses come, peal following peal on...
Page 55 - s prone to repeat his own lyrics sometimes, Not his best, though, for those are struck off at white-heats When the heart in his breast like a trip-hammer beats, And can ne'er be repeated again any more Than they could have been carefully plotted before...
Page 174 - Might serve some use or other. So there it lay, through wet and dry As empty as the last new sonnet, Till by and by came Mercury, And, having mused upon it, Why, here," cried he, " the thing of things In shape, material, and dimension ! Give it but strings, and, lo, it sings, A wonderful invention ! " So said, so done ; the chords he strained, And, as his fingers o'er them hovered, The shell disdained a soul had gained, The lyre had been discovered. O empty world that round us lies, Dead shell, of...
Page 62 - d do that, I should feel very ill at ease ; The men who have given to one character life And objective existence are not very rife ; You may number them all, both prose-writers and singers, Without overrunning the bounds of your fingers, And Natty won't go to oblivion quicker Than Adams the parson or Primrose the vicar.
Page 41 - s most abounding, the other 's to seek ; C.'s generals require to be seen in the mass, — E.'s specialties gain if enlarged by the glass ; C. gives Nature and God his own fits of the blues, And rims common-sense things with mystical hues, — E. sits in a mystery calm and intense, And looks coolly around him with sharp common sense; C. shows you how every-day matters unite With the dim transdiurnal recesses of night, — While E., in a plain, preternatural way, Makes mysteries matters of mere every...
Page 289 - Like music heard once by an ear That cannot forget or reclaim it, A something so shy, it would shame it To make it a show, A something too vague, could I name it, For others to know, As if I had lived it or dreamed it, As if I had acted or schemed it, Long ago...
Page 218 - Your morals most drearily true ; But, since the earth clashed on her coffin, I keep hearing that, and not you. Console if you will, I can bear it ; 'T is a well-meant alms of breath ; But not all the preaching since Adam Has made Death other than Death.
Page 85 - You went crazy last year over Bulwer's New Timon; — Why, if B., to the day of his dying, should rhyme on, Heaping verses on verses and tomes upon tomes, He could ne'er reach the best point and vigor of Holmes. His are just the fine hands, too, to weave you a lyric Full of fancy, fun, feeling, or spiced with satyric In a measure so kindly, you doubt if the toes That are trodden upon are your own or your foes'.

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