The Adventvres of Captain Bonneville, V.S.A.: In the Rocky Movntains and the Far West: Digested from His Jovrnal and Illustrated from Variovs Other Sovrces, Volume 1

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Page 240 - is a good country. The Great Spirit has put it exactly in the right place ; while you are in it you fare well ; whenever you go out of it, whichever way you travel, you fare worse. " If you go to the south, you have to wander over great barren plains ; the water is warm and bad, and you meet the fever and ague.
Page 241 - The Crow country is exactly in the right place. It has snowy mountains and sunny plains ; all kinds of climates, and good things for every season.
Page 228 - But the rich treat for the worthy captain was to see the " chivalry " of the various encampments, engaged in contests of skill at running, jumping, wrestling, shooting with the rifle, and running horses. And then their rough hunters' feastings and carousals. They drank together, they sang, they laughed, they whooped ; they tried to outbrag and outlie each other in stories of their adventures and achievements. Here the free trappers were in all their glory ; they considered themselves the "cocks of...
Page 13 - Bonneville, who lead a life of more continued exertion, peril, and excitement, and who are more enamoured of their occupations, than the free trappers of the West. No toil, no danger, no privation can turn the trapper from his pursuit. His passionate excitement at times resembles a mania. In vain may the most vigilant and cruel savages beset his path; in vain may rocks, and precipices, and wintry torrents oppose his progress; let but a single track of a beaver meet his eye, and he forgets all dangers...
Page 229 - ... beads, and glittering trinkets, were bought at any price, and scores run up without any thought how they were ever to be rubbed off. The free trappers, especially, were extravagant in their purchases. For a free mountaineer to pause at a paltry consideration of dollars and cents, in the attainment of any object that might strike his MAD WOLVES. 231 fancy, would stamp him with the mark of the beast in the estimation of his comrades.
Page 160 - ... daily brought into camp, and the flesh of those which were young and fat, was extolled as superior to the finest mutton. Here, then, there was a cessation from toil, from hunger, and alarm. Past ills and dangers were forgotten. The hunt, the game, the song, the story, the rough though good-humored joke, made time pass joyously away, and plenty and security reigned throughout the camp.
Page 13 - There is, perhaps, no class of men on the face of the earth, says Captain Bonneville, who lead a life of more continued exertion, peril, and excitement, and who are more enamored of their occupations, than the free trappers of the West.

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