The Age of Great Dreams: America in the 1960s

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Macmillan, Apr 1, 1994 - History - 296 pages
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In this absorbing new book, David Farber gives us the history of our collective and individual memories of the 1960s: the brilliant colors of revolt and rapture, of flames and raised fists, of napalm and tear gas, of people desperate to make history even as others fought fiercely to stop them. More than thirty years after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, this book grounds our understanding of the terrible events of that era by linking them to our country's grand projects of previous decades: the forging of a national system of social provision in the New Deal; our new agenda as global superpower after World War II; the creation of the national security state; and the maturation of a national consumer-driven mass-mediated marketplace. Farber's account, based on years of research in archives and oral histories as well as in the historical literature, deals in full not only with nation building in Vietnam, the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Watts riot, and the War on Poverty, but with the entertainment business, the drug culture, and much more.
 

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The age of great dreams: America in the 1960s

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In this reasoned and readable survey of the momentous social and political events of the 1960s, historian Farber sympathetically looks at this period without rose-colored glasses, critically analyzing ... Read full review

Contents

GOOD TIMES
7
THE WORLD AS SEEN FROM THE WHITE HOUSE 19601963
25
THE MEANING OF NATIONAL CULTURE
49
FREEDOM
67
THE LIBERAL DREAM ITS NIGHTMARE
90
VIETNAM
117
A NATION AT WAR
138
THE WAR WITHIN
167
STORMY WEATHER
190
RN AND THE POLITICS OF DECEPTION
212
A NEW WORLD
239
CONCLUSIONS
263
BIBLIOGRAPHIC ESSAY
269
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
279
INDEX
283
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About the author (1994)

David Farber teaches history at the University of New Mexico and is the author of Chicago '68 and co-author, with Beth Bailey, of The First Strange Place: The Alchemy of Race and Sex in World War II Hawaii.

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