The Age Reviewed: A Satire: in Two Parts ...

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W. Carpenter, 1827 - London (England) - 339 pages
 

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Page 262 - But midst the crowd, the hum, the shock of men, To hear, to see, to feel, and to possess, And roam along, the world's tired denizen, With none who bless us, none whom we can bless; Minions of splendour shrinking from distress! None that, with kindred consciousness endued, If we were not, would seem to smile the less Of all that flatter'd, follow'd, sought, and sued; This is to be alone; this, this is solitude.
Page 195 - No condition is now too obscure for its abuse, and the protector has become the tyrant of the people. In this manner the freedom of the press is beginning to sow the seeds of its own dissolution; the great must oppose it from principle, and the weak from fear; till at last every rank of mankind shall be found to give up its benefits, content with security from insults.
Page 207 - Come, leave the loathed stage, And the more loathsome age ; Where pride and impudence, in faction knit, Usurp the chair of wit ! Indicting and arraigning every day Something they call a play. Let their fastidious, vain Commission of the brain Run on and rage, sweat, censure, and condemn ; They were not made for thee, less thou for them. Say that thou pour'st them wheat, And they will acorns...
Page 195 - I have always considered the press as the protector of our freedom, as a watchful guardian, capable of uniting the weak against the encroachments of power. What concerns the public most properly admits of a public discussion. But, of late, the press has turned from defending public interest to making inroads upon private life; from combating the strong to overwhelming the feeble.
Page 233 - Where is the world,' cries Young, at eighty? 'Where The world in which a man was born?' Alas! Where is the world of eight years past?
Page 76 - The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece ! Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peace, Where Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung ! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set.
Page 228 - Swept from the palace, and see others' daughters Spring with the dew o' the court, having mine own So much desir'd and lov'd — by the duke's son ? No, I would raise my state upon her breast, And call her eyes my tenants ; I would count My yearly maintenance upon her cheeks ; Take coach upon her lip ; and all her parts Should keep men after men ; and I would ride In pleasure upon pleasure.
Page 161 - But now I'm going to be immoral ; now I mean to show things really as they are, Not as they ought to be : for I avow, That till we see what's what in fact, we're far From much improvement with that virtuous plough Which skims the surface, leaving scarce a scar Upon the black loam long manured by Vice, Only to keep its corn at the old price.
Page 64 - AUTHORITY intoxicates, And makes mere sots of magistrates ; The fumes of it invade the brain, And make men giddy, proud, and vain : By this the fool commands the wise, The noble with the base complies, The sot assumes the rule of wit, And cowards make the base submit.

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