The anatomy of melancholy, by Democritus iunior

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Page 195 - Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a phantasm in the habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to her house, in the suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician, by birth, and if he would tarry with her, he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no man should molest him ; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that was fair and lovely to behold.
Page 310 - ... remedium amoris to another man, a dowdy, a slut, a scold, a nasty rank, rammy, filthy, beastly quean, dishonest peradventure, obscene, base, beggarly, rude, foolish, untaught, peevish, Irus...
Page 109 - Tobacco, divine, rare, superexcellent tobacco, which goes far beyond all the panaceas, potable gold, and philosopher's stones, a sovereign remedy to all diseases. A good vomit, I confess, a virtuous herb, if it be well qualified, opportunely taken, and medicinally used ; but as it is commonly abused by most men, which take it as tinkers do ale, 'tis a plague, a mischief, a violent purger of goods, lands, health; hellish, devilish and damned tobacco, the ruin and overthrow of body and soul.
Page 43 - For the poor shall not alway be forgotten ; the patient abiding of the meek shall not perish for ever.
Page 6 - ... tis past, thou wilt say thou wert most happy ; and after a little miss, wish with all thine heart thou hadst the same content again — mightest lead but such a life — a world for such a life ! the remembrance of it is pleasant.
Page 92 - Many an old wife or country woman doth often more good with a few known and common garden herbs, than our bombast physicians, with all their prodigious, sumptuous, far-fetched, rare, conjectural medicines...
Page 130 - The Turks have a drink called coffee (for they use no wine) , so named of a berry as black as soot and as bitter (like that black drink which was in use among the Lacedemonians and perhaps the same), which they sip still of, and sup as warm as they can suffer...
Page 164 - Not that we are fair, nor for any merit or grace of ours, for we are most vile and base ; but out of His incomparable love and goodness, out of His Divine Nature. And this is that Homer's golden chain, which reacheth down from heaven to earth, by which every creature is annexed, and depends on his Creator.
Page 75 - For what glory is it, if when ye be buffeted for your faults ye take it patiently ? but if, when ye do well and suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with God.
Page 267 - Malo me Galatea petit, lasciva puella, et fugit ad salices, et se cupit ante videri.

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