The ancient mariner and other poems

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Appleton and company, 1900 - 144 pages
 

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Page 85 - It ceased; yet still the sails made on A pleasant noise till noon, A noise like of a hidden brook In the leafy month of June, That to the sleeping woods all night Singeth a quiet tune.
Page 140 - And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething, As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing, A mighty fountain momently was forced : Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail: And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reach'd the caverns measureless to man, And sank...
Page 79 - The souls did from their bodies fly — They fled to bliss or woe! And every soul, it passed me by, Like the whizz of my cross-bow 1 PART IV "I fear thee, ancient Mariner!
Page 62 - The thought suggested itself (to which of us I do not recollect) that a series of poems might be composed of two sorts. In the one, the incidents and the agents were to be, in part at least, supernatural; and the excellence aimed at was to consist in the interesting of the affections by the dramatic truth of such emotions as would naturally accompany such situations, supposing them real.
Page 82 - Oh sleep! it is a gentle thing, Beloved from pole to pole! To Mary Queen the praise be given! She sent the gentle sleep from Heaven, That slid into my soul.
Page 88 - Like one, that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
Page 73 - God save thee, ancient Mariner! From the fiends that plague thee thus ! — Why look'st thou so?
Page 72 - At length did cross an Albatross, Thorough the fog it came; As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God's name.
Page 90 - On every corse there stood. This seraph-band, each waved his hand : It was a heavenly sight ! They stood as signals to the land, Each one a lovely light : This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart — No voice; but oh! the silence sank Like music on my heart.
Page 78 - We listened and looked sideways up! Fear at my heart, as at a cup, My life-blood seemed to sip! The stars were dim, and thick the night, The steersman's face by his lamp gleamed white; From the sails the dew did drip — Till clomb above the eastern bar The horne'd Moon, with one bright star Within the nether tip.

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