The Angler's Museum: Or, The Whole Art of Float and Fly Fishing ... The Whole Carefully Collected from Actual Experience

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Page 9 - Never raise a large fish out of the water by taking the hair to which your hook is fastened, or indeed any part of the line, into your hand ; but either put a landing-net under him, or, for want of that, your hat : you may indeed, in fly-fishing lay hold of your line to draw a fish to you, but this must be done with caution.
Page 16 - Thumb, but do not wipe them, ftretch each Grafs as long as it will yield, coil them up in Rings, and lay them by, and you will find them become near as fmall, full as round, and much ftronger than the beft fingle Hairs you can get.
Page 29 - ... and likewise so much of the other end as will reach to the bank or a bush, where it is to be fastened. In this position you may leave it to take its chance while you are angling elsewhere. As soon as the pike takes the bait, and runs away with it, the line unwinds itself off the trimmer...
Page 116 - ... stream of water shall run or be, or wherein shall be any river, stream, pond, pool, moat, stew, or other water, and by any ways, means, or device whatsoever shall steal, take, kill, or destroy any fish bred, kept, or preserved...
Page 99 - Your rod must be strong, your line the same as for trowling, with an armed hook, and your bait must lie ledger. Some catch eels with spears, one of which (a cord having been first fastened through a hole bored at the top) being darted into the mud, in the middle or deepest...
Page 10 - Gut ; remember always to foak it about an Hour in Water before you ufe it ^ This will make it tough, and prevent its breaking.
Page 30 - ... until he has time to pouch the bait. Trolling in ponds is performed with a long line, which must reach from one side to the other. It should have as many armed hooks and baits about three yards asunder, as the line will allow. This method requires an assistant, who must hold one end of it, and help to keep it in a gentle motion, until you find you have a bite, and then you must strike with a jerk the contrary way to the motion of the fish. The salmon has been justly called the king of fresh-water...
Page 6 - Circumftanccs, though fonr.etimes it may vary ten or fifteen Days, by Means of ftrong Winds or bad Weather. We may form an adequate Idea of other Fifh of Paflage from the Herrings and Cods. The former feem to have their principal Rendezvous between the Points of Scotland, Norway, and Denmark. From thence the Danijh...
Page 81 - ... he will take a lob-worm at top, as a trout does a fly ; or, between the weeds, in a clear place, sink it without a float, about eight inches in the water, with only one large shot on the line, which is to be lodged on the leaf of some weed ; then retire, keeping your eye upon the shot...
Page 101 - Tic both ends of the thread together, and then make them up into about a dozen or twenty links. The common way is to wrap them about a dozen times round the hand, and then tying them all together in one place, makes the links very readily. This done, faflen them all to a fmall cord, or part of a trowling line, about four yards in length.

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