The Annals of Bristol in the Eighteenth Century

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author, 1893 - Bristol (England) - 550 pages
 

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Page 294 - After the cart drew away, the hangman very deservedly had his head broke for endeavouring to pull off Mooney's shoes ; and a fellow had like to have been killed in mounting the gallows, to take away the ropes that were left after the malefactors were cut down. A young woman came fifteen miles for the sake of the rope from Mooney's neck, which was given to her ; it being by many apprehended that the halter of an executed person will charm away the ague, and perform many other cures.
Page 492 - To my great grief and indignation, the poor trembling wretch was dragged out from a hole in the top of a house, where she had hid herself, and forced on board ship.
Page 222 - From thence you come to a key along the old wall, with houses on both sides, and, in the middle of the street, as far as you can see, hundreds of ships, their masts as thick as they can stand by one another, which is the oddest and most surprising sight imaginable. This street is fuller of them than the Thames from London bridge to Deptford...
Page 445 - The worthy gentleman who has been snatched from us at the moment of the election, and in the middle of the contest, whilst his desires were as warm and his hopes as eager as ours, has feelingly told us what shadows we are and what shadows we pursue.
Page 377 - I did go to Bristol, the dirtiest great shop I ever saw, with so foul a river, that, had I seen the least appearance of cleanliness, I should have concluded they washed all their linen in it, as they do at Paris. Going into the town, I was struck with a large Gothic building, coal-black, and striped with white; I took it for the devil's cathedral. When I came nearer, I found it was an uniform castle, lately built, and serving for stables and offices to a smart false Gothic house on the other side...
Page 331 - Street, near the College Green. On Monday after Easter will be opened a School for Young Ladies by Mary " FFBJ, 20 Nov. 1762. 36 Ibid., 30 Jan. 1768. More and Sisters, where will be carefully taught French, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, and Needlework. Young Ladies boarded on reasonable terms.
Page 222 - Wells, and over a bridge built on both sides like London bridge, and as much crowded with a strange mixture of seamen, women, children, loaded horses, asses, and sledges with goods, dragging along all together, without posts to separate them. From thence you come to a key along the old wall, with houses on both sides, and, in the middle of the street, as far as you can see, hundreds of ships, their masts as thick as they can stand by one another, which is the...
Page 492 - I cannot forbear telling you, that at my city of Bristol, during church-time, the congregations were surprised last Sunday with the bell of the public crier in the streets. It was so unusual a sound on that day that the people were alarmed in the churches. They found that the bellman was crying a reward of a guinea to...
Page 189 - In 1734 I went to Bristol, with some recommendations to eminent merchants ; but in a few months found that scene totally unsuitable to me.
Page 221 - Despising all men, and despis'd by all. Sons, while thy cliffs a ditch-like river laves, Rude as thy rocks, and muddy as thy waves ; Of thoughts as narrow as of words...

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