The Antisymmetry of Syntax

Front Cover
MIT Press, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 195 pages
3 Reviews

It is standardly assumed that Universal Grammar (UG) allows a given hierarchical representation to be associated with more than one linear order. For example, English and Japanese phrases consisting of a verb and its complement are thought of as symmetrical to one another, differing only in linear order. The Antisymmetry of Syntax proposes a restrictive theory of word order and phrase structure that denies this assumption. According to this theory, phrase structure always completely determines linear order, so that if two phrases differ in linear order, they must also differ in hierarchical structure.More specifically, Richard Kayne shows that asymmetric c-command invariably maps into linear precedence. From this follows, with few further hypotheses, a highly specific theory of word order in UG: that complement positions must always follow their associated head, and that specifiers and adjoined elements must always precede the phrase that they are sister to. A further result is that standard X-bar theory is not a primitive component of UG. Rather, X-bar theory expresses a set of antisymmetric properties of phrase structure. This antisymmetry is inherited from the more basic antisymmetry of linear order.Linguistic Inquiry Monograph No. 25

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is a bit dated but still certainly a must-read for anyone interested in syntax and typology.
As someone else said, you will see it mentioned and cited everywhere if you study syntax, so it's worth a read.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Insulting.

Contents

Chapter
6
Deriving XBar Theory
7
Chapter 4
33
Parameter
47
Coordination
57
Chapter 9
117
Chapter 10
131
References
171
Index
187
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information