The Apperception of the Spoken Sentence: A Study in the Psychology of Language

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Cornell university, 1900 - Apperception - 52 pages
 

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Page 51 - The mental state which we call understanding the meaning of a word need not involve any distinction of the multiplicity of parts belonging to the object signified by it. To bring this multiplicity before consciousness in its fullness or particularity would involve the imagining of objects with sensory qualities, visual, auditory, 1 Stout, GF: Analytic Psychology.
Page 52 - ... understanding the meaning of a word need not involve any distinction of the multiplicity of parts belonging to the object signified by it. To bring this multiplicity before consciousness in its fulness and particularity would involve the imaging of objects with their sensory qualities, visual, auditory, tactual, etc. But it has often been pointed out that in ordinary discourse the understanding of the import of a word is something quite distinct from having a mental image suggested by the word.
Page 52 - There is no absurdity," he says, "in supposing a mode of presentational consciousness which is not composed of visual, auditory, tactual and other experiences derived from and in some degree resembling in quality the sensations -of the special senses; and there is no absurdity...
Page 29 - ... than sensory terms, is assigned to the physical stimulus. This use of the term apperception is at least within the definition given by Stout. For, according to this authority, it is by the process of apperception that "a presentation acquires a certain significance for thought by connecting itself with some mental preformation as this has been organized in the course of previous experience.
Page 29 - A mental group or system is a grouped or systematised tendency, and the union of such groups or systems is the confluence of different modes of mental activity. It is needful to say this, because the familiar Herbartian treatment of apperception is apt to suggest a notion that the presentations concerned in it are distinct and independent agents, instead of being special modifications of the general current of conscious life. 2. MENTAL SYSTEMS.
Page 34 - Under the conditions of our experiment, and with the observers tested, the apperception of auditory symbols involves the presence in consciousness of visual and verbal ideas mainly; ie , the conscious ''stuff of the auditory symbolic apperception is made up in large part of -visual and verbal (visual-auditory-kinaesthetic) sense elements. The auditory and...
Page 54 - ... namely, the previous significance of similar presentations. As development continued and experience widened, the recognition of identity in ' meanings ' became more and more automatic, became pushed back farther and farther into the margin of consciousness. In the adult apperceptive consciousness there is, as we have seen, no constancy in the quality and modality of the focal constituents. With very few exceptions — of which the
Page 52 - There is no absurdity in supposing a mode of presentational consciousness which is not composed of visual, auditory, tactual and other experiences derived from, and in some degree resembling in quality the sensations of the special senses ; and there is no absurdity in supposing such modes of consciousness to possess a representative value or significance for thought, analogous in some degree to that which attaches to images, just as revived images may have a representative value in some degree comparable...
Page 30 - add all possible information as to the character of the mental processes which went on during the apperception of the sentence, with especial regard to the pattern of the apperceptive consciousness — the presence or absence of definite and tangible ' imagery ', the concomitant affective phenomena, kinaesthetic sensations, etc.
Page 22 - ... are given with a minimum of context, the chances for their correct perception are increased by 82% as compared with their chances of correct perception when given without context. 3. The fact of mutilation is readily noticed in the single words given without context, even though the word be finally correctly perceived; the elision is not so readily noted when the word is given with a minimum of context.

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