The Archaeology of Korea

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Cambridge University Press, May 13, 1993 - History - 307 pages
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Sarah Nelson's book surveys Korean prehistory from the earliest paleolithic settlers, perhaps half a million years ago, through the formation of the Three Kingdoms and on to the creation of United Silla in AD 668, when the peninsula was largely united for the first time. The author treats the development of state-level societies and their relationship to polities in Japan and China, and the development of a Korean ethnic identity. Emphasizing the particular features of the region, the author dispels the notion that the culture and traditions of Korea are pale imitations of those of its neighbors, China and Japan.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Western views of Korea
4
Geographic limits
5
Korean physical anthropology language and culture
6
Data sources
8
Korean archaeological sequences
10
Environment
12
Climate
19
Chronology
113
Artifacts
116
Settlements
138
Subsistence
144
Burials
147
Rock art
154
Myth legend and history
155
Migration diffusion or local development?
157

Flora
20
Paleoclimate
22
Summary
24
Forest foragers
26
Early paleolithic
30
The Neanderthal question
43
Late paleolithic
47
The paleolithicHolocene boundary
53
Conclusion
55
Early Villages
58
Sites
59
Chronology
95
Subsistence
98
Social organization
104
Symbols and styles
106
Summary
108
Megaliths Rice and Bronze 2000 to 500 BC
110
Summary
161
Iron Trade and Exploitation 400 BC to AD 300
164
Documentary sources
165
Archaeological evidence
172
Regional differences
183
Summary
202
Three Kingdoms AD 300668
206
Koguryo
207
Paekche
220
Kaya
237
Silla
243
Summary
260
Ethnicity in retrospect
262
Boundaries
263
Population movement
265
Summary
267
Copyright

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Page 268 - Neolithic also pecked and painted rock to produce petroglyphs representing "masks" (or anthropomorphic beings), animals, birds, snakes, and boats. Suggested Readings Ackerman, Robert E. (1982). "The Neolithic-Bronze Age Cultures of Asia and the Norton Phase of Alaskan Prehistory.
Page 271 - Development of Natural Environment in the Southern Part of Liaoning Province During the Last 10,000 Years.
Page 295 - Sample, LL, and Albert Mohr (1964). "Progress Report on Archaeological Research in the Republic of Korea.
Page 282 - Kent, Kate P. and Sarah M. Nelson 1976 Net Sinkers or Weft Weights?
Page 283 - Sources of Cohesion and Fragmentation in the Silla Kingdom," Journal of Korean Studies (University of Washington), Aug. 1968. 2224 JAMIESON, John Charles. The Samguk sagi and the Unification Wars. California, Berkeley, 1969. 351p. DA 30 (Nov. 1969), 1984-A; UM 69-18,938. The author's primary concern is to determine how Silla, during the reign of Kim Pommin (660-681), rose "from a position...
Page 295 - The Paleolithic Age of Japan in the Context of East Asia: A Brief Introduction," in Windows on the Japanese Past: Studies in Archaeology and Prebistory.191-97 , ed.

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