The Architectural Annual, 1907

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The League, 1908 - Architecture - 143 pages
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Page 228 - Pilch and Tarred Felt has grown from small beginnings, fifty years ago, to almost universal adoption. A great majority of all the first-class buildings of the country are now covered with roofs of Coal Tar Pitch and Felt, with a top surface of either Slag or Gravel, and from the standpoints of economy and satisfaction this form of roofing is far superior to any other. We can point to numerous buildings covered with such roofs which have been in use...
Page 229 - Felt are recognized as standard materials. That the United States Government considers this form of waterproofing as best is evidenced by the fact that it was used in the construction of the New Custom House in New York City, which is illustrated herewith. This building is a type of the finest modern construction, and one of the most substantial owned by the Federal Government. All parts of the building underground, as well as the side walls, were made waterproof by the use of UNITED STATES CUSTOM...
Page 229 - For waterproofing cellars, foundation walls, vault arches, tunnels, and all underground construction, Coal Tar Pitch and Tarred Felt are recognized as standard materials. That the United States Government considers this form of waterproofing as best is evidenced by the fact that it was used in the construction of the New Custom House in New York City, which is illustrated herewith. This building is a type of the finest modern construction, and one of the most substantial owned by the Federal Government....
Page 230 - I. at Fall River, illustrated herewith, was covered with 65,000 yards of gravel roofing over thirty years ago. No repairs have been necessary of any kind except for metal work, and the cost of same has been one-fifth of a cent per square foot per year of service.
Page 249 - IN ENGLISH HOMES THE INTERNAL CHARACTER, FURNITURE, AND ADORNMENTS OF SOME OF THE MOST NOTABLE HOUSES OF ENGLAND. Historically depicted from photographs specially taken by CHARLES LATHAM.
Page lvii - ... slip from his shoulder the body of the Christ, helps to form a pat-tern as ingeniously combined as that of any ornamentation or brocade, meant merely for the soothing of the eye. But none of these subtleties is insisted upon to the detriment of the dramatic story, and, as in most of Rubens's paintings, we are unaware of the subtlety and combinations of lines and sur-faces which make the artistic structure of what seems to us a mere rendering of nature, or the sweep of exuberant and poetic passion.
Page 230 - Coal Tar materials. The Government is also using this method of waterproofing in a number of new and elaborate buildings now in the course of erection at West Point and in fortification work in other parts of the country. One of the most striking instances of the permanency of Coal Tar Pitch and Felt Waterproofing was found in the old New York Central and Hudson River tunnel, under Park Avenue, in New York City. Early in 1905, work on the new terminal improvements necessitated the tearing out of...
Page 238 - King's Windsor Cement FOR PLASTERING WALLS AND CEILINGS Elastic in its nature, can be applied with 25 per cent, less labor and has I2j^ per cent, more covering capacity than any other similar material JB KING & CO.
Page lvi - The Descent from the Cross" is, then, a wise and balanced work, composed of marvelous adjustments of planes and lines, so that each motion, each fold, even the out-balanced foot of the man at the arms of the cross, who has just let slip from his shoulder the body of the Christ, helps to form a pat-tern as ingeniously combined as that of any ornamentation or brocade, meant merely for the soothing of the eye. But none of these subtleties is insisted upon to the detriment of the dramatic story, and,...
Page lvii - ... inheritance of the early dreamers, and though it may be the landscape of dreamland, his landscape is perhaps the most essential part of his painting, which, to the usual looker-on, is an assemblage of figures. It is decidedly the landscape of that particular dream, and its line, its disposition, its color, are woven into the story so as to be inseparable from the action of the people who live within it. I have written somewhere else that this necessity for a true bond between the figure and the...

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