The architectural history of Exeter cathedral

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1873
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Page 11 - His first work was the transformation of the great transeptal crossing from Romanesque ponderousness to Gothic grace. To appreciate the manner in which he initiated the process of translating the massive Norman-French into elegant Middle-Pointed English, we must take our stand in the transept crossing: say at the south-west angle, looking north-east. The great features are the mazy windows, fluted arches, branched vaulting, and slender Purbeck shafts, and the pierced balconies attached to the massive...
Page 4 - Freeman, whose account of the Cathedral (based historically in great measure on the Fabric Rolls, which are all but complete from the year 1279 to the year 1514) is the best we have, goes so far as to say that it exhibits " perhaps the most perfect specimen in the world of bilateral (or right and left hand) symmetry. Not only does aisle answer to aisle, and pillar to pillar, and window tracery to window tracery, but also chapel to chapel, screen to screen, and even tomb to tomb, and canopy to canopy.
Page 35 - Canons (as the case might be), were enabled to rest in some degree during an unusually long service, without altogether abandoning the standing position. As early as 1121, Peter of Clugny speaks of "the raising up of the seats...
Page 4 - Our cathedral with its transept exhibits, perhaps, the most perfect specimen in the world of bilateral (or right and left hand) symmetry. Not only does aisle answer to aisle, and pillar to pillar, and window tracery to window tracery, but also chapel to chapel, screen to screen, and even tomb to tomb, and canopy to canopy ; St. John Baptist's Chapel and screen to St. Paul's, St. James's to St. Andrew's, St. Saviour's to St. George's, St. Gabriel's to St. Mary Magdalene's, Simon of Apulia's tomb and...
Page 39 - ... tombs, leaving one without a head and another without an arm. They pluck down and deface the statue of an ancient queen, the wife of Edward the confessor, mistaking it for the statue of the blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of God. They brake down the organs, and, taking two or three hundred pipes with them, in a most scornful, contemptuous manner, went up and down the street, piping with them; and, meeting some of the choristers...
Page 34 - Afterwards, the device was hit upon by some comfort-loving ecclesiastic of making the seat move upon hinges or pivots, so that it could, at times, be turned up and present a smaller seat, giving less...
Page 17 - A careful examination of the Fabric Roll entries," says Archdeacon Freeman, "showing the exact correspondence between the quantities of glass provided, and the area of the several windows which I have named, renders it certain that these and no others are intended.
Page 1 - ... pure, nor less serene, than that of the hermit spirit which once lighted with white lines of cloisters the glades of the Alpine pine, and raised into ordered spires the wild rocks of the Norman sea ; which gave to the temple gate the depth and darkness of Elijah's Horeb cave ; and lifted, out of the populous city, grey cliffs of lonely stone, into the midst of sailing birds and silent air.
Page 71 - X of his own church .... which place, by the since enlarging of his church is now within the south tower of the same.
Page 55 - The minstrels' gallery in the nave was most probably an afterthought. In the Roll of 1353 it is said that, " In the first week after Trinity, May 20th, 1353, was the beginning of the new work...

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