The Architecture and Engineering of Digital Computer Complexes, Volume 1

Front Cover
Springer US, 1971 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 847 pages
Computer science is a blend of engineering and mathematics. Being com paratively new, the field has not settled down to a definite mixture of science and engineering, but still contains large parts of both technology and art. Many computer scientists are trying to make computer science into a branch of mathematics, or to at least closely resemble mathematics. This approach tends to emphasize Turing machines, abstract linguistics, etc. Unfortunately these abstract models are often about as relevant to the real world as the mathematical theorem that you can't trisect an angle with ruler and compass-it is true, but we have protractors and marks on our rulers, so that practically we trisect angles every day. Against the mathematical approach are the hard facts of life: the com puter is a real, physical machine; it is often very eXpensive and hence the reality of economics enters; the machine is often a large collection of various parts whose working together must be controlled properly; and finally the whole exists to be used by humans in their work and not merely to be admired. Of necessity, these and many other related aspects are ignored in the mathe matical models. At the other extreme are the hard-nosed engineers who often become trapped in the crises, details, and day-to-day operation of the com puting center. They tend to adopt a strictly experimental, pragmatic approach.

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Contents

Chapter
1
Malfunction Detection
5
Chapter
9
The Architects Job
11
Chapter
12
Chapter
14
Synopsis 395
15
The Procurement Cycle
24
Priority Authority Security and Privacy 519
198
The Components of Programming
208
Chapter 6
234
Bootstraps and Loaders
247
The Complex in Retrospect 845
285
References
291
The Statistical Analysis of Programs
318
meters of a Simple Flow Chart
326

Systems
28
The Executive Processor
30
A Philosophy for System Architecture
36
Problems
47
The Construction Cycle
51
Modalities
68
The Basic Instruction Repertoire
74
Chapter 4
101
Summary
168
Scheduling and Optimization 514
173
Executive Assignment 702
185
Table Techniques
189
Chapter 11
342
Queuing Theory Summary
384
Summary
391
Viability
xxxix
Job Control 509
xl
The Configuration Switching Network and Rec onfiguration 707
xli
239
xliii
The Measure of Viability 627
xlvi
819
xlvii
250
xlix
696
l
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