The architecture of ancient Egypt: in which the columns are arranged in orders and the temples classified, with remarks on the early progress of architecture, etc

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J. Murray, 1850 - Architecture - 150 pages
 

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Page 119 - ... Egyptian religion. This was the great mystery ; and this myth and his worship were of the earliest times, and universal in Egypt. He was to every Egyptian the great judge of the dead ; and it is evident that Moses abstained from making any very pointed allusion to the future state of man, because it would have recalled the wellknown Judge of the dead, and all the funeral ceremonies of Egypt, and have brought back the thoughts of the *
Page 98 - Ethiopian stone of various hues," which still remains. Their colours were principally blue, red, green, black, yellow, and white. The red was an earthy bole ; the yellow an iron ochre ; the green was a mixture of a little ochre with a pulverulent glass, made by vitrifying the oxides of copper and iron with sand and soda...
Page 114 - But the attributes of this Being were represented under positive forms ; and hence arose a multiplicity of gods, that engendered idolatry, and caused a total misconception of the real nature of the Deity, in the minds of all who were not admitted to a knowledge of the truth through the mysteries. The division of God into his attributes was in this manner.
Page 115 - Being were represented under positive forms ; and hence arose a multiplicity of gods, that engendered idolatry, and caused a total misconception of the real nature of the Deity, in the minds of all who were not admitted to a knowledge of the truth through the mysteries. The division of God into his attributes was in this manner. As soon as he was thought to have any reference to his works, or to man, he ceased to be quiescent ; he became an agent ; and he was no longer the One, but distinguishable...
Page 132 - I say." nation of the chronology, and the succession of the Pharaohs, as Mr. Stuart Poole's work on the subject will soon be published ; and I have much pleasure in stating how fully I agree with him in the contemporaneousness of certain kings, and in the order of succession he gives to the early Pharaohs.
Page 127 - Osiris, his coming upon earth for the benefit of mankind, with the titles of "manifester of good and truth," his being put to death by the malice of the evil one ; his burial and resurrection, and his becoming the judge of the dead, are the most interesting features of the Egyptian religion. This was the great mystery ; and this myth and his worship were of the earliest times, and universal in Egypt.
Page 3 - ... is not, therefore, surprising that the Greeks should have admitted into their early art some of the forms then most in vogue; and though the wonderful taste of that gifted people speedily raised them to a point of excellence, never attained by the Egyptians or any others, the rise and first germs of art and architecture must be sought in the valley of the Nile. In the oldest monuments of Greece, the sloping or pyramidal line constantly predominates ; the columns in the oldest Greek order are...
Page 99 - ... by vitrifying the oxides of copper and iron with sand and soda; the blue was a glass of like composition without the ochreous addition ; the black was bone or ivory black; and the white a very pure chalk. They were mixed with water ; and apparently a little gum to render them tenacious and adhesive. With the Egyptians the favourite combination of colour was red, blue, and green ; when black was introduced, yellow was added to harmonise with it : and in like manner they sought for every hue its...
Page 112 - Àpud majores nobiles aut sub montibus altis, aut in ipsis montibus sepeliebantur, unde natum est ut super cadavera aut pyramides fièrent aut ingénies collocarentur columnae (3).
Page 25 - that the pictures and statues made ten thousand years ago, are in no one particular better or worse than what they now make.

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