The Art of Pleasing

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Robert Clarke & Company, 1875 - Interpersonal relations - 39 pages
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Page 7 - It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes. Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown ; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But mercy is above this sceptered sway ; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings ; It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice.
Page 7 - The quality of mercy is not strained ; It droppeth, as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath : it is twice blessed ; It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes...
Page 7 - But mercy is above this sceptred sway ; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation : we do pray for mercy ; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.
Page 8 - O'ertaken there By the mountain blast, I 've laid me flat along, And while gust followed gust more furiously, As if to sweep me o'er the horrid brink, And I have thought of other lands, whose storms Are summer flaws to those of mine, and just Have wished me there; — the thought that mine was free Has checked that wish, and I have raised my head, And cried in thraldom to that furious wind, Blow on ! This is the land of liberty ! K.
Page 35 - How happy could I be with either, Were t'other dear Charmer away!
Page 45 - Generalship ' is one of the most thoroughly entertaining books we ever read, and its charms are those which survive not one alone, but many perusals. Scattered through the book are scenes of wonderful pathos that fill with tears eyes just now smiling with mirth. Yet there is much in the book besides mere emotional excitement ; there is much knowledge of human nature and worldly wisdom, and young...
Page 45 - The charm of the narrative is its sweet humor, and the glimpses it gives of domestic life among the middle and poorer classes of Scotland. The sim.plicity of manner, the shrewdness of observation, the graphic description, the real humor and melting pathos which alternate like bright sunlight and deep shadows over a Scotch landscape, make this a really fascinating book, and a delight from beginning to end."—Cincinnati Commercial.

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