The Art of Wood Inlay: Projects & Patterns

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Sterling Publishing Company, Inc., 2004 - Crafts & Hobbies - 128 pages
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Inlay is a wonderful way to create flowers, scenes, figures, and other intricate and colorful designs on wood objects--and a great opportunity to work with small quantities of rare and costly woods (also precious metals, leather, mother-of-pearl, and other materials). Today, since veneers and marquetry have come to substitute for inlay, this book helps to carry on the tradition of an almost forgotten art, and shows modern craftspeople how to use it to make plain objects special. Through detailed instructions, diagrams, and photographs, every step in the inlay process unfolds, including a special section on finishing. The spectacular projects feature everything from a pretty floral tray to Christmas ornaments, from a bookstand to a set of nested bowls--even jewelry!
 

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VERY INTERESTING BOOK LOTS OF WOODEN TECHNIQUES CAN LEARN.

Contents

Preparatory Inlay Projects
11
Picture Frame
18
Being Careful 6 Vegetable Wall Plaque
26
Bulrush Plaques
32
Tool Sharpening 11 Decorative Tiles
39
Inlay Press 13 Poinsettia Plaque
46
Inlay Techniques 18 Fruit Tray
71
Round Acorn Box
85
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

George Stevens, Jr., is an award-winning writer, director and producer, and founder of the American Film Institute. He has received eleven Emmys, two Peabody Awards and seven Writers Guild of America Awards for his television productions, including the annual "Kennedy Center Honors," "The Murder of Mary Phagan" and "Separate but Equal," His production "The Thin Red Line" was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including best picture. He worked with his father, acclaimed director George Stevens, on his productions of "Shane, Giant" and "The Diary of Anne Frank" and in 1962 was named head of the United States Information Agency's motion picture division by Edward R. Murrow. Stevens was director of the AFI from 1967 until 1980, before returning to film and television production. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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