The Art Teaching of John Ruskin

Front Cover
Percival, 1891 - ART - 376 pages
An understanding of John Ruskin's aesthetic theories is important in providing the influences to the discussion of photography as art and the idea of the appropriate purpose of photographic education.
 

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Contents

His Successive Periods
20
Modern Painters Group
27
Oxford Lectures Group
30
CHAPTER II
34
Fancy
35
Aphoristic Definitions
36
Great Art and High Art
38
Art and Manufacture
40
Ideas of Power
42
Machinery and Art
45
Photography and Art
47
Programme of the Subject
49
CHAPTER III
53
Deceptive Imitation
55
The Mimetic Instinct
57
Representation
59
Fact and Effect
60
The Most Important Truths
62
Selection
65
Idealism and Realism
66
CHAPTER IV
68
The Platonic Archetype
69
The Academic ArtPhilosophy
71
The Revolt against Academicism
73
The War of Physics and Metaphysics
75
Specialisation
76
Character
77
CHAPTER V
80
Three Stages of Art
81
The Interest of Individualisation
83
Individualisation in Poetry
85
Individualisation in Painting
86
Realistic Detail
88
Idealistic Detail
90
Finish
91
Completion Right and Wrong
93
CHAPTER VI
95
Does Science help Art?
97
The Use of Science to Art
99
Historypainting and Archaeology
102
Perspective and Geometry
105
Landscape and Natural Science
106
Draughtsmanship and Anatomy
108
The Nude
109
CHAPTER VII
113
Erroneous Opinions on Beauty
114
Taste
116
Theoria andEsthesis
117
Typical Beauty
120
The Theology of Beauty
123
Vital Beauty
125
Ugliness Caricature and the Picturesque
127
Surface PAGE
128
Sublimity
129
CHAPTER VIII
131
Imagination and Truth
134
Associative Imagination
136
Penetrative Imagination
137
Contemplative Imagination
138
Grotesque
140
Symbolism
143
Inspiration
146
CHAPTER IX
149
Genius and Talent
151
The Three Uses of Art
153
The Influence of Religion upon Art
156
Religious Art
158
The Service of Art to Religion
161
Religion and Artists
163
CHAPTER X
166
The Effect of Art upon the Artist
168
The Effect of the Artists Morality on his Art
170
Art for Arts Sake
172
Didactic Art
173
Decadence
195
Local Art
197
National Art
199
CHAPTER XII
202
ArtWealth
206
Discovery
208
Application
211
Distribution
214
The Wages of Art
216
The Work of Art
218
CHAPTER XIII
222
A priori Development of Architecture
224
Architecture as a Fine Art
226
Laws of Architecture
227
Styles
230
Proportion and Decoration
233
Sculptured Ornament
234
Ornament and Structure
236
Architectural Colour
237
CHAPTER XIV
240
Arts and Crafts
241
Technical Conditions
242
its Reasons
246
its Fallacies
248
Naturalism in Ornament
250
Abstraction
251
CHAPTER XV
253
Organised Form
254
Natural Grouping
256
Imaginative Grouping
257
Invention
259
Three Stages of Design
260
Rules of Composition
261
Laws of Composition
263
CHAPTER XVI
268
Incision
271
BasRelief
272
Kinds of Relief
276
Statuary
277
The Vices of Sculpture
279
The Virtues of Sculpture
281
CHAPTER XVII
284
Linear Texture
289
Curvature
290
Methods of Engraving
292
Woodcutting
295
Etching
297
Mezzotint
300
CHAPTER XVIII
303
Shade
304
Methods of Draughtsmanship
306
Transparency and Value
307
Pen and Wash
310
The Three Kinds of Chiaroscuro
312
The Schools of Line
315
The Schools of Chiaroscuro
318
The Schools of Colour
322
The Mutual Dependence of Drawing and Colouring
325
The Kinds of Colour
327
Laws of Colour
329
The Three Divisions of Painting
333
Execution
335
157 Style
337
CHAPTER XX
340
The Aim of ArtStudy
343
Study for Amateurs
345
Who are the Masters ?
347
Standards of ArtStudy
349
Study from Nature
353
Teaching and Criticism
356
The Function of the Critic
358
The Criteria of Art
360
The Future of Art
363

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Page 77 - So it is in many matters of opinion. Our first and last coincide, though on different grounds; it is the middle stage which is farthest from the truth. Childhood often holds a truth with its feeble fingers, which the grasp of manhood cannot retain, which it is the pride of utmost age to recover.
Page 361 - Art, brutality" (I forget the words, but that is their purport): and now, in writing beneath the cloudless peace of the snows of Chamouni, what must be the really final words of the book, which their beauty inspired and their strength guided, I am able, with yet happier and calmer heart than ever heretofore, to enforce its simplest assurance of Faith, that the knowledge of what is beautiful leads on, and is the first step, to the knowledge of the things which are lovely and of good report; and that...
Page 139 - A fine grotesque is the expression, in a moment, by a series of symbols thrown together in bold and fearless connection, of truths which it would have taken a long time to express in any verbal way, and of which the connection is left for the beholder to work out for himself ; the gaps, left or overleaped by the haste of the imagination, forming the grotesque character.
Page 144 - The best in this kind are but shadows ; and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them.
Page 115 - And perfect happiness is some sort of energy of Contemplation, for all the life of the gods is (therein) glad ; and that of men, glad in the degree in which some likeness to the gods in this energy belongs to them. For none other of living creatures (but men only) can be happy, since in no way can they have any part in Contemplation.
Page 277 - The modern system of modelling the work in clay, getting it into form by machinery and by the hands of subordinates, and touching it at last, if, indeed, the (so-called) sculptor...
Page 278 - ... 1. Not only sculpture, but all the other fine arts, must be for the people. 2. They must be didactic to the people, and that as their chief end. The structural arts, didactic in their manner ; the graphic arts in their matter also. 3. And chiefly the great representative and imaginative arts, that is to say, the drama, and sculpture, are to teach what is noble in past history, and lovely in existing human and organic life.
Page 278 - ... be, in glory. An elementary principle which has been too long out of mind. 142. I leave you to consider it, since, for some time, we shall not again be able to take up the inquiries to which it leads. But, ultimately, I do not doubt that you will rest satisfied in these following conclusions : 1. Not only sculpture, but all the other fine arts, must be for the people. 2. They must be didactic to the people, and that as their chief end.
Page 358 - Those are the two first attributes of the best art. Faultless workmanship, and perfect serenity ; a continuous, not momentary, action, — or entire inaction. You are to be interested in the living creatures ; not in what is happening to them. Then the third attribute of the best art is that it compels you to think of the spirit of the creature, and therefore of its face, more than of its body. And the fourth is that in the face you shall be led to see only beauty or joy ; — never vileness, vice,...
Page 68 - Memory, at whose blessed knee The Nine, which thy dear daughters be, Learnt of the majestic past ; And thou, that in some antre vast Leaning afar off dost lie, Otiose Eternity, Keeping the tablets and decrees Of Jove, and the ephemerides Of the gods, and calendars Of the ever festal stars ; Say, who was .he, the sunless shade, After whose pattern man was made ; He first, the full of ages, born With the old pale polar morn, Sole, yet all ; first visible thought...

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