The Associative Processes of the Guinea Pig: A Study of the Psychical Development of an Animal with a Nervous System Well Medullated at Birth ...

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University of Chicago, 1904 - Animal intelligence - 67 pages
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Page 50 - He has never seen an object and remembers nothing. The guinea pig at that age has triumphantly recalled a complex path at the end of which he sits eating his well-deserved carrot. At twenty-three days the rat is lifting latches neatly, and forming what Hobhouse calls practical judgments...
Page 17 - Observation had indicated that carrot or other vegetable food furnished no stimulus toward which the very young guinea 1 Preparations of the guinea pig's eye were kindly made and examined by Dr. JR SLONAKER, in this laboratory, and the above statement is made upon his authority. pig would react. Therefore I desired to find whether the mother herself could furnish a motive for a solution of a problem. In order to do that the following preliminary experiment was made : I put guinea pigs two hours old...
Page 8 - ... the practical judgment," and the "practical idea." By a practical idea is meant "the function which directs action, not necessarily in accord with habit or instinct, to the production of a certain perceptible result. It is further a necessary part of such an idea that it rests on a perceptual basis, and is capable of being brought into relation with another such idea, for example, as means to end.
Page 50 - When the guinea pig has forced his way through a labyrinth, he has reached the end of his psychical powers. He cannot pull a latch nor push a bolt; he will not depress an inclined plane, chew a string, nor stamp his foot. . . . The experience of the white rat extends to strange combinations of wires and springs, and all the delightful surprises revealed by secret doors. But when the guinea pig has turned the proper number of corners, his dinner must be waiting for him or he does not...
Page 35 - I II III IV V VI VII VIM IX X XI XII...
Page 19 - ... what its significance may be, why it arises and disappears as it does, and what form it assumes in the adult I do not know definitely. The guinea pig will run for a few steps, then give a sudden jump forward or in some other direction, then run and jump again. The jump may not be preceded by a running movement ; it may be forward close to the ground, or shorter and somewhat more in the air. The jump is so sudden and violent as to be quite startling. It reminds one of the playfulness of a little...
Page 25 - Text-figure 5. As usual the labyrinth was made entirely of wire. A, B, C are alleys from which there is no exit. The entrance to the wire box, X, is very small and is open. Care was taken to have the whole cage free from any odor. The mother was placed at X and the little one at Y. Time for finding the mother in the first trial was 5-i66 min.
Page 43 - Text-figure 10. At cc cards of different colors could be slipped into a frame. AA are blind alleys, and// removable partitions of glass. X is the food. Preliminary experiments were made to see whether the guinea pig tends to form a habit of going in a certain direction for food. If any preference were shown it was for the right hand path (Text-fig. 10.) A glass partition was then put at p on the left path. The right path was soon learned. The cards (white and red) at cc were interchanged. Not a particle...
Page 23 - Text-figure j. It still scratched and gnawed at the old place, but failing to get out, set out on an exploring tour. In 1.33 min. it had found the door. It then ran around the box in the direction of the arrows to get out at y, but found itself shut off there. It began to look again, and in .58 min. had found the opening at z. Total time, 2.083 min. Replaced in A (Text-fig. 4). The guinea pig sat perfectly still for 1.91 min. Then it turned around and pushed gently at the point where the door had...
Page 20 - ... A guinea pig will gnaw for five minutes at a freely swinging door without happening to give it a hard enough push to open it. The gentle swinging of the door back and forth seemed to suggest nothing. All attempts made thus far to give problems similar to those solved by cats and dogs (by THORNDIKE, HOBHOUSE and others) were unsuccessful, in the case of the adult as well as the young. Even though extremely hungry the little fellow will get discouraged after finding that all the methods he knows...

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