The Bard, and Minor Poems

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1842 - 288 pages
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Page xi - Alas, what boots it, with incessant care To tend the homely, slighted shepherd's trade. And strictly meditate the thankless Muse? Were it not better done, as others use, To sport with Amaryllis in the shade, Or with the tangles of Necera's hair
Page 165 - now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the Queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she scarcely seemed to touch, a more delightful vision. I saw her
Page 165 - above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in,— glittering like the morning star, full of life, and splendour, and joy."—Edmund
Page 259 - And Miriam the Prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand; and all the women went after her, with timbrels and
Page 128 - In vain, alas! in vain, ye gallant few, From rank to rank your volley'd thunders flew, O, bloodiest picture in the book of Time, Sarmatia fell, unwept, without a crime. Found not a generous
Page 55 - are children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air.
Page 128 - O, bloodiest picture in the book of Time, Sarmatia fell, unwept, without a crime. Found not a generous
Page 235 - The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve; And like an unsubstantial pageant faded, Leave not a wreck behind.
Page ii - will take refuge with the citizen and the mechanic, and she will intermingle herself with the simplest details of their daily life. Weary of uttering a language which the great no longer comprehend, she will murmur, in the ear of the humble, words of affection and sympathy. And in Germany, has she not
Page xii - mighty towns contend for Homer dead, Through which the living Homer begged his bread.

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