The Beginners of a Nation: A History of the Source and Rise of the Earliest English Settlements in America, with Special Reference to the Life and Character of the People

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1896 - United States - 377 pages
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Page 18 - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 146 - Lord raised up in those days) to see further into things by the light of the word of God. How not only these base and beggerly ceremonies were unlawfull, but also that the lordly and tiranous power of the prelats ought not to be submitted unto...
Page 187 - The experience that was had in this comone course and condition, tried sundrie years, and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanitie of that conceite of...
Page 155 - Lord reveiled further unto him. And in ye end, by ye tirrany of ye bishops against godly preachers & people, in silenceing the one & persecuting ye other, he and many more of those times begane to looke further into things...
Page 167 - ... burden, were oftentimes so oppressed with their heavy labors, that though their minds were free and willing, yet their bodies bowed under the weight of the same, and became decrepit in their early youth; the vigor of nature being consumed in the very bud, as it were.
Page 140 - Yet notwithstanding, all parsons, vicars, and curates shall teach and declare unto their parishioners, that they may with a safe and quiet conscience, after their common prayer in the time of harvest, labour upon the holy and festival days, and save that thing which God hath sent...
Page 135 - ... of meanes. So that it is verie hard to knowe, who is noble, who is worshipfull, who is a gentleman, who is not...
Page 330 - Grace, grafted on a crab-stock," in 1660, growled, after his 'wont, on account of the " Heart of New England, rent with the blasphemies of this generation." John Cotton, the ablest man in New England, who " liked to sweeten his mouth with a piece of Calvin, before he went to sleep...
Page 140 - that all parsons, vicars and curates shall teach and declare unto their parishioners, that they may with a safe and quiet conscience, in the time of harvest, labour upon the holy and festival days, and save that thing which God hath sent. And if, for any scrupulosity or grudge of conscience, men should superstitiously abstain from working upon those days, that they should grievously offend and displease God.
Page 131 - It is almost incredible," says Fuller, " how taking this doctrine was, partly because of its own purity, and partly for the eminent piety of such persons as maintained it ; so that the Lord's day, especially in corporations, began to be precisely kept, people becoming a law to themselves, forbearing such sports as yet by statute permitted; yea, many rejoicing at their own restraint herein.

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