Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the Macabre: The Best of H. P. Lovecraft

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Random House Publishing Group, Oct 29, 2002 - Fiction - 432 pages
34 Reviews
This is the collection that true fans of horror fiction have been waiting for: sixteen of H.P. Lovecraft's most horrifying visions, including Lovecraft's masterpiece, THE SHADOW OUT OF TIME--the shocking revelation of the mysterious forces that hold all mankind in their fearsome grip.
"I think it is beyond doubt that H.P. Lovecraft has yet to be surpassed as the Twentieth Century's greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale."
Stephen King


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TJWilson - LibraryThing

I would like to start off this review with a few words that I will always associate with HP Lovecraft after reading this, a modest offering of his work: foetid, febrile and eldritch. There. That's ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - josh314 - LibraryThing

This is a great collection of tales from the master. My only quibble is that it is hard to imagine that "the best of HP Lovecraft" does not include At the Mountains of Madness. But one can tell that ... Read full review

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Contents

The Picture in the House
20
Pickmans Model
33
The Silver Key
53
The Call of Cthulhu
72
The Dunwich Horror
98
The Whisperer in Darkness
136
The Colour Out of Space
193
The Haunter of the Dark
218
The Thing on the Doorstep
239
The Shadow Over Innsmouth
262
The Dreams in the WitchHouse
318
The Shadow Out of Time
350
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About the author (2002)

Almost completely ignored by the mainstream press during his lifetime, H. P. Lovecraft has since come to be recognized as one of the greatest writers of classic horror, on a par with Edgar Allan Poe, Lovecraft's mentor. H. P. Lovecraft's work has been translated into more than a dozen languages, his tales adapted for film, television, and comic books, and he has been the subject of more scholarly study than any other writer of horror fiction save Poe.

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