The Birth of Pleasure

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Alfred A. Knopf, 2002 - Psychology - 253 pages
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Why do humans experience so much pain before finding pleasure in love? Gilligan, who revolutionized gender studies with her examination of girls' moral development (In a Different Voice, 1982), offers some tentative answers. She opens with a quotation, "The power of love upsets the order of things," and throughout the text considers that disturbing power. There are two roads, one leading to life, the other to death, Moses said after descending from Mt. Sinai; by urging followers to choose life, he said in effect: Choose love. But, Gilligan (Humanities/NYU) wonders, what is the best route to find love? The allusion to Moses is just one of hundreds of allusions, as Gilligan seeks a part of the answer in stories. Adam and Eve at odds with God; Cupid, wounded with his own arrow for love of Psyche; teenager Anne Frank writing in her diary while hiding from the Nazis; the doomed love of Almasy and Katharine in The English Patient--these are among the stories from which Gilligan derives or tests her concepts

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THE BIRTH OF PLEASURE

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Why do humans experience so much pain before finding pleasure in love? Gilligan, who revolutionized gender studies with her examination of girls' moral development (In a Different Voice, 1982), offers ... Read full review

The birth of pleasure

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Called psychology yet drawing on literature from Greek mythology to Shakespeare to Toni Morrison, this book by gender scholar Gilligan considers the path of loveDand pleasureDthrough time. Read full review

Contents

A Radical Geography of Love
3
Regions of Light
57
in The Birth of Pleasure
157
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About the author (2002)

Carol Gilligan is one of America's most distinguished writers and teachers in the field of psychology. She was born and raised in New York City and earned her Ph.D. from Harvard, where she was a member of the faculty for thirty-four years. Her award-winning research led in 1997 to the creation of Harvard's first professorship in Gender Studies and in 2001 to the founding of the university's Center for Gender and Education. In a Different Voice has been translated into seventeen languages. She returned to New York and is now University Professor at NYU. She lives with her husband in New York City and in the Berkshires.

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