The Bogie Man

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1913 - 21 pages
 

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Page 11 - There is many an estated lord couldn't reach you out a fourpenny bit. DARBY. The grandest house around the seas of Ireland he should have, beautifully made up! You would nearly go astray in it ! It wouldn't be known what you could make of it at all ! You wouldn't have it walked in a month ! TAIG. What is that beside having a range of shops as wide maybe as the street beyond? DARBY. A house would be the capital of the county! One door for the rich, one door for the common! Velvet carpets rolled up,...
Page 12 - ... month! Taig: What is that beside having a range of shops as wide maybe as the street beyond? Darby: A house would be the capital of the county! One door for the rich, one door for the common! Velvet carpets rolled up, the way there would no dust from the chimney fall upon them. A hundred wouldn't be many standing in a corner of that place! A high bed of feathers, curled hair mattresses. A cover laid on it would be flowery with blossoms of gold! Taig: Muslin and gauze, cambric and linen! Canton...
Page 5 - Little he'd think of you," she'd say; "you without body and puny, not fit to lift scraws from off the field, and Timothy bringing in profit to his mother's hand, and earning prizes and rewards." TAIG. The time it would fail me to follow my book or to say off my A,B, ab, to draw Dermot down on me she would. "Before he was up to your age," she would lay down, "he was fitted to say off Catechisms and to read newses.
Page 20 - I'll be a pattern to myself. DARBY. I am well content being free of you, the way you were pictured to be. I declare to my goodness, the name of you put terror on me through the whole of my lifetime, and your image to be clogging and checking me on every side. TAIG. To be thinking of you being in the world was a holy terror to myself. I give you my word you came through my sleep the same as a scarecrow or a dragon. DARBY. It is great things I will be doing from this out, we two having nothing to cast...
Page 9 - I'll let on to be a master of learning and of Latin ! DARBY. Ah, what letting on? It is Timothy will look through me the same as if my eyes were windows, and my thoughts standing as plain as cattle under the risen sun! It is easier letting on to have knowledge than to put on manners and behaviour. TAIG. Ah, what's manners but to refuse no man a share of your bite and to keep back your hand from throwing stones? DARBY. I tell you I'm in shivers ! My heart that is shaking like an ivy leaf! My bones...
Page 19 - ... There is nothing at this time against me eating my bit of a herring. (Seizes it and takes a bite.) TAIG. Give me a divide of it. DARBY. Give me a drop of your own porter so, is in the bottle. There need be no dread on you now, of you being no match for your grand man. TAIG. That is so. (Drinks.") I'll strive no more to fit myself for high quality relations. I am free from patterns of high up cousins from this out. I'll be a pattern to myself.
Page 20 - It is to the harbors of America we will work our way across the wideness of the sea. It is well able we should be to go mounting up aloft in ropes. Come on, Darby, out of this ! DARBY. There is magic and mastery come into me ! This day has put wings to my heart ! TAIG. Be easy now. We are maybe not clear of the chimneys yet. DARBY. What signifies chimneys ? We...
Page 18 - DARBY. If I had would I be sitting on this floor? TAIG. You thief you ! DARBY. Thief yourself ! Turn around now till I will measure your features and your face. — "Yourself is it! Is it personating my cousin Timothy you are? TAIG. I am personating no one but myself. DARBY. You letting on to be an estated magistrate and my own cousin and such a great generation of a man ! And you not owning so much as a rood of ridges ! TAIG. Covering yourself with choice clothing for to deceive me and to lead me...
Page 6 - I ran from him with the brush and the bag, and went foraging around for myself. Darby: So am I going around by myself. I never had a comrade lad. Taig: My mother that would hit me a crack if I made free with any of the chaps of the village, saying that would not serve me with Dermot, that had a good top-coat and was brought up to manners and behaviour.
Page 18 - ... It is Mary was her Christened name. Taig: So was my own mother of the McGarritys. It is sisters they were sure enough. Darby: That makes us out to be full cousins in the heel. Taig: You no better than myself! And the prayers I used to be saying for you, and you but a sketch and an excuse of a man! Darby: Ah, I am thinking people put more in their prayers than was ever put in them by God. Taig: Our mothers picturing us to one another as if we were the best in the world. Darby: Lies I suppose they...

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