The Boy who Loved to Draw: Benjamin West

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Houghton Mifflin, 1999 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 48 pages
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When Benjamin West was seven years old, the only thing in the world he wanted to do was draw pictures. For a time, that got him into a peck of trouble. Papa wasn't pleased when Benjamin "borrowed" his best quill pen. Mama wasn't happy that Benjamin would rather sketch the cows than milk them. And Grimalkin, the family cat, was not keen on being the source for paintbrush hairs! Truth was, there was nothing Benjamin cared more about than art, and that led him to some surprising adventures. Here, in lively easy-to-read words and vivid pictures, is the engaging true story of Benjamin West, the farmboy from colonial Pennsylvania who grew up to become the first world-famous American artist and a friend to Benjamin Franklin and the king of England.

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User Review  - kmacneill - LibraryThing

This is about Benjamin West and how he became an artist. Benjamin's love for drawing got him into trouble quite often. He would skip out on his chores and daydream and draw. He was also so desperate ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Barbara Brenner was born on June 26, 1925, in Brooklyn, New York. Brenner attended Seton Hall College and Rutgers University from 1942-46, while also working as a copy editor at Prudential Insurance Company. Her freelance work as an artist's agent prepared her for a literary life. In 1957 she published her first book, Somebody's Slippers, Somebody's Shoes. She followed this book with an educational picture book entitled Barto Takes the Subway, designed to improve reading comprehension and sight vocabulary. Her artistic development continued when she began to collaborate with her husband, illustrator Fred Brenner, on The Flying Patchwork Quilt. Her next book, On the Frontier with Mr. Audubon, was selected by School Library Journal as The Best of the Best among children's books published over 26 seasons. One of her bestselling titles was Wagon Wheels (published in 1978), which deals with the trials and tribulations of a close-knit African American family. In 1986, Brenner was honored with the Pennsylvania School Librarians' Association's Outstanding Pennsylvania Author Award. Brenner's most celebrated book is a collection entitled Voices: Poetry and Art from around the World, for which she was chief editor. This book received an ALA Notable Book for Children mention and an ALA Best Book for Young Adults award.

Olivier Dunrea was born in Virginia Beach, Virginia in 1953. He earned a B.A. from West Chester State College in 1975 and his M.A. in theater and music from Washington State University the following year. Beginning in 1983 Dunrea has written and illustrated more than 50 books for children. The gosling characters Gossie and Ollie are two of his most beloved creations.

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