The Building Materials of Pennsylvania: Brownstones. I.

Front Cover
C.M. Busch, state printer, 1896 - Sandstone - 122 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - A third method is that which is commonly known as the specific gravity bottle. By this method "a small bottle is weighed, filled with distilled water and weighed again. The bottle is then emptied, dried, the powdered stone put in, and reweighed. These weights give the weight of the stone and the weight of the bottle full of water. The bottle containing the sample is partly filled with water and suction applied to exhaust the air bubbles, the filling completed, and another weight taken."2 The specific...
Page 27 - York. *By the common method, the specific gravity equals the weight of the specimen in the air divided by the difference between the weight in air and the weight in water...
Page 70 - ... mine, in the NW. \ SE. \ sec. 30, T. 22 N., R. 75 W., about a quarter of a mile north of old Rock Creek station, now Rock Creek post-office. This mine was opened in 1888. The bentonite outcrops on the slopes of the hill with a thickness of 4 to 5 feet, and dips to the south at an angle of 4 or 5, the same angle as the slope of the hill, so that the bed is exposed over several acres. The top, consisting of a few inches of weathered debris, is stripped off and the bentonite loaded onto wagons...
Page 87 - ... in size from a fraction of an inch to a foot or more, in diameter the average size being about three inches.
Page 28 - Other things being equal, it may properly be said that the value of a stone for building purposes is inversely as its porosity or absorbing power.
Page 33 - State geological map, underlies the coal measures of the west and west central portion of the State. So far as is known to the writer...
Page 101 - ... surface, while in other places it is covered with glacial boulders, sand and gravel, to a depth varying from a few inches to three or four feet. Frequently from two to six feet at the top of the bed will be shelly or "wild" and thrown out with the waste, but in some places the shelly stone is wholly lacking.
Page 48 - ... the layers can be readily split into any thickness desired. These seams are more abundant near the out-crop and least so in the bottom of the quarry. The joint seams in these quarries are not numerous and not very regular. There are are a few incipient cracks due to the bending or folding of...
Page 64 - Walton quarry and rock-cut of the Northern Central Railroad, on the west bank of the Susquehanna river opposite Harrisburg ; where a consecutive series of the beds, all conformable, and all dipping regularly about 30 to the southward, afforded a good opportunity for collecting two sets of specimens for analysis, one at the bottom and the other at the top of the cut. Great care was taken to survey...
Page 117 - It has a fine, even grain, dark brown and reddish colors. OHIO. Brownstone occurs in several places in Ohio, as shown by the samples in Orton Hall, at the Ohio State University, at Columbus, but the only one known in the general market is the Killbuck stone. The quarry is located on a hill about three quarters of a mile above the Killbuck station, on a branch of the Akron, Cleveland and Ohio •References: 1. Building Stone in New York, by JC Smock. Bulletin New York Sta,'e Museum. Volume II, No....

Bibliographic information