The Business of Finance

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E.P. Dutton, 1918 - Finance - 204 pages
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Page 27 - A bill of exchange is an unconditional order in writing, addressed by one person to another, signed by the person giving it, requiring the person to whom it is addressed to pay on demand or at a fixed or determinable future time a sum certain in money to or to the order of a specified person, or to bearer.
Page 113 - ... in every such report shall state whether, in their opinion, the balance sheet referred to in the report is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the state of the company's affairs as shown by the books of the company, and such report shall be read before the company in general meeting.
Page 235 - Written with all the clarity and vigour which have rendered the author's books on kindred subjects so popular ... is quite sound. and it can be recommended to all who desire to obtain an insight into what is primarily a subject of the day." — Financial Times. " Mr. Hartley Withers has the happy gift of being able to light up. and even make plain to the ordinary man, the mysteries of the money market and the mechanism of exchange . . . interesting and informative, it should make an appeal to a wide...
Page 236 - The book views its subject from the advantageous position of an impartial observer, the respective cases for capital and labour, rich and poor, producer and consumer, being brought to the reader's attention in a convincingly logical manner.
Page 113 - Company's affairs according to the best of our information and the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the Company.
Page 235 - Should be of the greatest value to investors and all who take an interest in City matters. ... It is eminently readable, and the description of a typical flotation, " Hygienic Toothpowder, Ltd.,
Page 236 - There can be no doubt that Mr. Withers' book will supersede all other introductions to monetary science . . . readers will find it a safe and indispensable guide through the mazes of the Money Market.
Page 95 - It was reported that there was much more cruelty in the Halifax pits than in those at Leeds and Bradford. A sub-commissioner met a boy crying and bleeding from a wound in the cheek, and his master explained " that the child was one of the slow ones, who would only move when he saw blood, and that by throwing a piece of coal at him for that purpose he had accomplished his object, and that he often adopted the like means.
Page 88 - ... of which Sir Alfred Booth, the Chairman of the Cunard Company, is a member, it is stated : The one outstanding cause of unrest which we find everywhere is the high cost of living, especially with regard to food. This is accompanied by complaints of exploitation, profiteering, and bad distribution. The initial cause of the rise in prices was the financial policy of the government, which has relied too much on loans — largely credit loans — and too little on taxation designed to check unnecessary...
Page 237 - Views its subject from the advantageous position of an impartial observer, the respective cases for capital and labour, rich and poor, being brought to the reader's attention in a convincingly logical manner."—Financial Times.

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