The Business of Home Management: (The Principles of Domestic Engineering)

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R.M. McBride & Company, 1915 - Home economics - 310 pages
 

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Page 193 - FOR the fact remains that all our efforts to apply the sources of power in nature to the use and convenience of man...
Page 219 - OI say these are not the parts and poems of the body only, but of the soul, OI say now these are the soul ! A WOMAN WAITS FOR ME.
Page 150 - Scientific management does not necessarily involve any great invention, nor the discovery of new or startling facts. It does, however, involve a certain combination of elements which have not existed in the past, namely, old knowledge so collected, analyzed, grouped, and classified into laws and rules that it constitutes a science...
Page 246 - ^'whose genius was such. We scarcely can praise it, or blame it, too much ; Who, born for the universe...
Page 208 - I pray you, O excellent wife, not to cumber yourself and me to get a rich dinner for this man or this woman who has alighted at our gate, nor a bedchamber made ready at too great a cost.
Page 129 - To break my dream the vessel reached its bound : And homeless near a thousand homes I stood, And near a thousand tables pined, and wanted food.
Page 209 - But let this stranger, if he will, in your looks, in your accent and behavior, read your heart and earnestness, your thought and will, which he cannot buy at any price, in any village or city ; and which he may well travel fifty miles, and dine sparely and sleep hard in order to behold. Certainly, let the board be spread and let the bed be dressed for the traveller ; but let not the emphasis of hospitality lie in tliese things.
Page 27 - As Emerson says truly in one of his essays : " Take off all the roofs from street to street, and we shall seldom find the Temple of any higher God than prudence. The progress of domestic living has been in cleanliness, in ventilation, in health, in decorum, in countless means and acts of comfort, in the concentration of all the utilities of every clime in each house. * * * The houses of the rich are confectioners...
Page 28 - He brings home thither whatever commodities and ornaments have for years allured his pursuit, and his character must be seen in them. But what idea predominates in our houses? 'Thrift first, then Convenience and Pleasure. Take off all the roofs from street to street, and we shall seldom find the temple of any higher god than Prudence. The progress of domestic living has been in cleanliness, in ventilation, in health, in decorum, in countless means and arts of comfort, in the concentration of all...
Page 146 - Take no heed for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink, or wherewithal ye shall be clothed ; but seek ye first the kingdom of God, and all these things shall be added unto you.

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