The Cathedral Church of Winchester: A Description of Its Fabric and a Brief History of the Episcopal See

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George Bell, 1899 - Cathedrals - 132 pages
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Page 138 - The volumes are handy in size, moderate in price, well illustrated, and written in a scholarly spirit. The history of cathedral and city is intelligently set forth and accompanied by a descriptive survey of the building in all its detail. The illustrations are copious and well selected, and the series bids fair to become an indispensable companion to the cathedral tourist in England."—Times.
Page 68 - Alas ! he's gone before, Gone to return no more. Our panting breasts aspire After their aged sire ; Whose well-spent life did last Full ninety years and past. But now he hath begun That, which will ne'er be done. Crown'd with eternal bliss, We wish our souls with his.
Page 123 - WILL BEAR, SWIFTNESS IN ERRAND THE STAG'S FEET DECLARE : LOADED HIS LEFT HAND APT TO LABOUR SAITH : THE VEST HIS NEATNESS, OPEN HAND HIS FAITH. GIRT WITH HIS SWORD, HIS SHIELD UPON HIS ARM, HIMSELF AND MASTER HE'LL PROTECT FROM HARM.
Page 116 - God, and that all his subjects, in what station soever they may be, are equally subjects to him ; and that no one of them any more than another hath authority either to make new laws for Christ's subjects, or to impose a sense upon the old ones, which is the same thing ; or to judge, censure or punish the servants of another master, in matters relating purely to conscience or salvation.
Page 137 - ST. ASAPH'S and BANGOR. By PB IRONSIDE BAX. GLASGOW. By P. MACGREGOR CHALMERS, IA, FSA (Scot).
Page 49 - Here, overthrown by death, lies William, surnamed Wykeham. He was Bishop of this Church, which he repaired. He was unbounded in hospitality, as the rich and poor can alike prove. He was also an able politician, and a counsellor of the State. By the colleges which he founded, his piety is made known ; The first of which is at Oxford, and the second at Winchester You, who behold this tomb, cease not to pray That, for such great merits, he may enjoy everlasting...
Page 138 - This set of books is an attempt to consult, more closely, and in greater detail than the usual guide-books do, the needs of visitors to the cathedral towns. The series cannot but prove markedly successful. In each book a business-like description is given of the fabric of the church to which the volume relates, and an interesting history of the relative diocese. The books are plentifully illustrated, anpl are thus made attractive as well as instructive.
Page 137 - For the purpose at which they aim they are admirably done, and there are few visitants to any of our noble shrines who will not enjoy their visit the better for being furnished with one of these delightful books, which can be slipped into the pocket and carried with ease, and is yet distinct and legible. ... A volume such as that on Canterbury is exactly what we want, and on our next visit we hope to have it with us. It is thoroughly helpful, and the views of the fair city and its noble cathedral...
Page 13 - Roman church could give to its ceremonies was lavished upon this. The queen, we are told, blazed with jewels to such an extent that the eye was blinded as it looked upon her ; her dress was of black velvet flashing with gems, and a splendid mantle of cloth of gold fell from her shoulders ; but through the mass that followed the marriage service she never took her eyes off the crucifix upon which they were devoutly fixed. Her fifty ladies -
Page 6 - ... altars, that distract attention from the threshold of the church, so that a stranger walking in the courts is at a loss where to turn, seeing on all sides doors open to him without any certain path. He stands with wondering eyes, fascinated with the fine roofs of the intricate structure, until some experienced guide conducts him to the portals of the farthest vestibule. Here, marvelling, he crosses himself, and knows not how to quit, so dazzling is the construction, and so brilliant the variety...

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